Difference between revisions of "GateTemple"

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* Archibald Dresser, DDGM, [http://masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=MADorchester4_1927-2003 District 4 (Dorchester)], 1949, 1950; '''[http://masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=MANecrologiesAG#DRESSER.2C_ARCHIBALD_1895-1969 N]'''
 
* Archibald Dresser, DDGM, [http://masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=MADorchester4_1927-2003 District 4 (Dorchester)], 1949, 1950; '''[http://masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=MANecrologiesAG#DRESSER.2C_ARCHIBALD_1895-1969 N]'''
 
* Fred C. Garvin, DDGM, [http://masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=MASouthBoston4_1883-1910 District 4 (South Boston)], 1907, 1908; '''[http://masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=MASuppNecrologiesAG#GARVIN.2C_FRED_CLIFFORD_1858-1935 SN]'''
 
* Fred C. Garvin, DDGM, [http://masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=MASouthBoston4_1883-1910 District 4 (South Boston)], 1907, 1908; '''[http://masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=MASuppNecrologiesAG#GARVIN.2C_FRED_CLIFFORD_1858-1935 SN]'''
 +
* ''Alan G. Leishman'', DDGM, [http://masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=MADISTRICT07_2003andAfter District 7], 2018, 2019
 
* Arthur J. H. Lucas, DDGM, [http://masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=MADorchester4_1927-2003 District 4 (Dorchester)], 1975, 1976; '''[http://masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=MANecrologiesHM#LUCAS.2C_ARTHUR_JAMESON_HENRY_1922-2014 N]'''
 
* Arthur J. H. Lucas, DDGM, [http://masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=MADorchester4_1927-2003 District 4 (Dorchester)], 1975, 1976; '''[http://masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=MANecrologiesHM#LUCAS.2C_ARTHUR_JAMESON_HENRY_1922-2014 N]'''
 
* ''Stephen F. McDonough'', DDGM, [http://masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=MASouthBoston4_1927-2003#BOSTON_4TH_DISTRICT District 4 (Boston)], 1995, 1996
 
* ''Stephen F. McDonough'', DDGM, [http://masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=MASouthBoston4_1927-2003#BOSTON_4TH_DISTRICT District 4 (Boston)], 1995, 1996

Revision as of 09:46, 27 December 2018

GATE OF THE TEMPLE LODGE

Location: South Boston; Boston (1949); Quincy (1964); Stoughton (1981).

Chartered By: Winslow Lewis

Charter Date: 03/13/1856 VI-7

Precedence Date: 03/15/1855

Current Status: In Grand Lodge vault; merged with Rising Star Lodge, 10/11/2012.


PAST MASTERS

  • Joseph H. Clinch, 1855
  • Richard M. Barker, 1856, 1857
  • Joseph W. Howard, 1858, 1859
  • Stephen W. Goodhue, 1860
  • Edwin Tilden, 1861
  • Benjamin Pope, 1862-1864; SN
  • Benjamin T. Wells, 1865-1867
  • Harry Drake, 1868
  • Joseph W. Tapley, 1869, 1870
  • Samuel Evans, 1871
  • Thomas H. Harding, 1872, 1873
  • Theodore L. Kelley, 1874, 1875
  • William H. Ruddick, 1876, 1877
  • Alban S. Green, 1878, 1879
  • Joseph R. Grose, 1880, 1881
  • Samuel M. Bedlington, 1882, 1883
  • Charles H. Porter, 1884-1886
  • Charles H. Kimball, 1887, 1888
  • John Kinnear, 1889, 1890
  • James A. Cook, 1891, 1892
  • Emerson H. Nye, 1893, 1894
  • William H. Stevenson, 1895, 1896
  • Bertram D. Amsden, 1897, 1898
  • Joseph G. Allen, 1899, 1900
  • Fred C. Garvin, 1901, 1902; SN
  • Robert E. Harrison, 1903, 1904
  • Charles F. Hamburger, 1905, 1906
  • John Halbritter, 1907, 1908
  • Olaf Olsen, 1909
  • Frank H. Sweetland, 1910
  • George L Cook, 1911, 1912
  • C. Summer Emerson, 1913, 1914
  • Theodore L. Kelley, Jr., 1915
  • Harry H. Ham, 1916
  • Edward M. Hagarty, 1917
  • Guy Andrews Ham, 1918
  • J. Collie Freeman, 1919
  • Frank R. Keith, 1920
  • Alexander Campbell, 1921
  • Amasa W. Bosworth, 1922
  • Bryon S. Jackson, 1923
  • George A. Weeks, 1924
  • Austlin Bryant, 1925
  • Frank L. Cushing, 1926
  • M. Winslow Haynes, 1927
  • George E. B. Paul, 1928
  • Robert T. Young, 1929
  • Henry J. Foster, 1930
  • Benjamin L. Walker, 1931
  • Otis W. Amsden, 1932
  • Harry O. Baker, 1933
  • Roland Paul, 1934
  • Ralph S. Bell, 1935-6
  • Archibald Dresser, 1937, 1938; N
  • Willis Dresser, 1939
  • Charles S. Strong, 1940
  • Allen Campbell, 1941
  • Guy P. Newcomb, 1942
  • Alfred Whitehead, 1943
  • Merle D. Rider, 1944
  • C. Robert Fraser, 1945
  • James Otis Lawrence, 1946
  • George T. R. Hassell, 1947
  • John W. MacLean, 1948
  • David J. A. McKinnell, 1949
  • George Heath Ellis, 1950
  • John Reid, 1951; N
  • Michael deV. Hassel, 1952
  • Ralph G. Pannington, 1953
  • Carlton S. Fisk, 1954
  • Vernon Myers, 1955
  • Rhey A. Wheelock, 1956
  • Rayman S. Jewell, 1957
  • Eric W. Hanson, 1958
  • Carl E. Julian, 1959
  • John E. Smith, 1960
  • Neil J. Rockwell, 1961
  • Andrew J. Musgrove, 1962
  • Roland J. Kinsman, 1963
  • Michael p. Sargavakian, 1964
  • James V. Mack, 1965
  • Armenag J. David, 1966, 1992-1994; N
  • Charles E. Hall, 1967, 1977
  • George H. Cutlip, 1968
  • Arthur J. H. Lucas, 1969; N
  • Edward G. Cluett, 1970
  • George Wyshak, 1971
  • George R. Bezreh, 1972
  • William L. Hall, 1973
  • Sarkis M. Sarkisian, 1974
  • Frank R. Porter, 1975, 1980, 1991, 1997, 2002, 2003, 2005; PDDGM
  • Peter T. Lucas, 1976
  • Robert S. Cluett, 1978, 1988
  • James R. Young, 1979
  • Stephen F. McDonough, 1981, 1985; PDDGM
  • John J. Cobb, 1982
  • Sarkis Simon, 1983
  • Michael S. Markarian, 1984
  • George A. Dwelly, 1986
  • James S. Parker, 1987
  • Peter H. Rupp, 1989
  • Avard C. O'Brien, 1990
  • Richard J. Musgrove, 1995, 1996
  • Renzo L. Bardetti, 1998, 1999
  • Gordon R. Earle, 2000, 2001, 2004
  • Lawrence VanLeer, 2006-2008
  • Krikor E. Kolandjian, 2009
  • Stanley S. Marshall, 2010-2012

REFERENCES IN GRAND LODGE PROCEEDINGS

  • Petition for Dispensation: 1855
  • Petition for Charter: 1856
  • Consolidation Petition (with Rising Star Lodge): 2012 from 2012 Proceedings

ANNIVERSARIES

  • 1862 (6th Anniversary; see below)
  • 1905 (50th Anniversary)
  • 1930 (75th Anniversary)
  • 1955 (Centenary)
  • 1980 (125th Anniversary)
  • 2005 (150th Anniversary)

VISITS BY GRAND MASTER

BY-LAW CHANGES

1870 1871 1875 1879 1890 1896 1905 1907 1911 1914 1916 1921 1925 1926 1946 1947 1953 1957 1962 1972 1973 1975 1982 1987 1994

HISTORY

  • 1930 (75th Anniversary History, 1930-193; see below)
  • 1955 (Centenary History, 1955-90; see below)
  • 1980 (History 1955-1980, 1980-46; see below)

75TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY, MARCH 1930

From Proceedings, Page 1930-193:

By Wor. Frank L. Cushing.

As we gather here tonight to celebrate the Seventy-fifth
Anniversary of the organization of Gate of the Temple 
Lodge, it is fitting that we should pause for a few moments
and turn back through the pages of our Records and take
a retrospective view of the journey over which we have
 traveled.

Our course has been a happy one; seldom has anything but the utmost harmony prevailed. Our aims have been high, our purposes worthy; and on this anniversary occasion, we recall with joy and pride a happy and prosperous past of multiplied deeds of charity and of sweet memories of burdens lightened and sorrowing hearts made glad by the tender administrations of Brotherly Love. The Lodge came into existence in a perfectly normal manner. Twelve representative men in this community, all members of the Craft, desiring to unite in the organization of a Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons in South Boston, drew up and indorsed the following:

Original Agreement.

We, the undersigned, hereby agree to lend our aid and support towards forming a new Lodge of Free and Accepted Ancient York Masonry in South Boston; and (if possible) we agree to attend the meeting which will be called to take the subject into consideration. Which meeting shall be duly notified to the signers of this paper and none others shall be admitted.

Signed By Brothers

  • 
Richard M. Barker
  • William E. Johnson
  • Isaac T. Campbell
  • George H. Bartlett
  • James F. G. Baxter
  • Joseph H. Clinch
  • William J. Radford
  • Joseph W. Howard
  • Samuel R. Spinney
  • Edwin B. Spinney
  • John S. H. Fogg
  • Ezra Barlow

The Original Meeting was held on February 28th, 1855, at the home of Joseph W. Howard, 151 Broadway. All of the signers of the above agreement, excepting Joseph W. Clinch and Isaac T. Campbell, were present.

The first five Officers were selected as follows:

  • Joseph H. Clinch. W. M.
  • Richard M. Barker, S. W.
  • Samuel R. Spinney, J. W.
  • James F. G. Baxter, Treas.
  • Geo. H. Bartlett, Secretary

On motion of Joseph W. Howard, the Fourth Tuesday of each month was adopted as the date for the Regular Meetings of the Lodge and this date has never been changed.

The Secretary was instructed to prepare a Petition to the Grand Master for a Dispensation and also a petition to St. Paul's Lodge, asking for a recommendation, to accompany our Petition to the Grand Master.

Other preliminary meetings were held at the same address on March 7th, 10th, and 15th.

It was voted at these meetings to permit Bros. Jacob C. Phelps, Thomas M. Spinney, William B. Holbrook, John W. F. Willson, and Alexander McDonald to sign the Petition to the Grand Lodge for a Dispensation.

Twenty-five dollars was adopted as the fee for conferring the three degrees on each accepted candidate.

The committee which had been appointed to select a name for the new Lodge reported that they had decided upon the name of "Trinity" Lodge and the Petition to the Grand Master for a Dispensation bore that name; but at the Grand Lodge meeting, for some reason not stated, they substituted the name of "Gate of the Temple" Lodge.

The Dispensation was issued by the Grand Master on March 14, 1855.

The first Regular Meeting of Gate of the Temple Lodge was held on March 27, 1855, at Masonick Hall, corner Broadway and B Street, and called to order at 7 1/2 o'clock P. M. and a Lodge of Master Masons opened in Due Form, under the following organization:

  • Richard M. Barker, East
  • Joseph W. Howard, West
  • Samuel R. Spinney, South
  • James F. G. Baxter, Treas.
  • Geo. B. Bartlett, Secy.
  • Jacob C. Phelps, S. D.
  • Ezra Harlow, J. D.
  • William J. Radford, S. S.
  • Thomas M. Spinney, J. S.
  • Edwin B. Spinney, Marshal
  • William B. Spinney, I. S.
  • J. McFarlan, Tyler

Applications for the Degrees were received from Stephen W. Goodhue, Henry C. Harden. Daniel Briscoe, and Freeman M. Josselyn. Jr. The first five Officers having been elected at a preliminary meeting, the remaining Officers were now elected as follows :

  • Jacob C. Phelps, S. D.
  • Ezra Harlow, J. D.
  • William J. Radford, S. S.
  • Thomas M. Spinney. J. S.
  • Alexander McDonald, Marshal
  • William B. Holbrook. I. S.

It is interesting to note that there were no Institution Ceremonies, such as we have today.

The Entered Apprentice Degree was worked for the first time on April 24, 1855; the Fellow Craft Degree on May 22, 1855, and the Master Masons Degree at the First Special Meeting of the Lodge on June 19, 1855. Bro. Stephen W. Goodhue was the first candidate to be Received and the first to be Raised in the Lodge.

At the Meeting of May 22, 1855, Bro. Samuel R. Spinney presented to the Lodge a set of Officers Collars and Jewels. The Collars have long since worn out, but the Jewels have been in continuous use by the Officers of the Lodge from that date and are worn by the Officers here tonight.

At this same meeting (May 22. 1855) Bro. Ezra Harlow for the Committee on hiring St. Paul's Lodge-room reported: that they had rented Masonick Hall for the use of Gate of the Temple Lodge for one hundred dollars for twelve regular meetings. Gate of the Temple Lodge to provide their own Tyler, whose duty shall he to take care of the hall in conjunction with the Tyler of St. Paul's Lodge, for which service, St. Paul's Lodge allows Gate of the Temple Lodge fifty cents per night. On extra nights for special meetings the hall may he occupied for the sum of seven dollars, Gate of the Temple Lodge to pay all expenses.

Gate of the Temple Lodge was Constituted on March 31, 1856 by the Officers of the Grand Lodge. (Winslow Lewis, Jr., Grand Master.) Bro. Richard M. Barker was installed as Master.

The first Official Visitation by the District Deputy Grand Master occurred on October 28, 1856; Wor. Clement A. Walker, D.D.G.M. At The Annual Meeting on Nov. 25. 1856. Wor. Joseph II. Clinch presided in the East during the election of Wor. Richard M. Barker as Master and then installed him in office. Although Bro. Clinch was Master of the Lodge while it operated "Under Dispensation," this is the first and only occasion, according to the Records, that he actually presided in the East. At all the Meetings held while U. D., the Senior Warden. Bro. Barker presided in the East and em if erred all the Degrees. Whenever Bro. Clinch was present, we find him occupying the Chaplain's station.

The By-Laws, as originally adopted, provided that a vote of five-sixths of the membership of the Lodge was required to amend them. An amendment was offered on Sept. 23, 1856, to change this requirement to five-sixths of the members present; but not until May 26, 1857, were they able to get out to the meeting the necessary five-sixths of the membership, and the amendment was then unanimously adopted. It is probable that there never has been a meeting of the Lodge since that time when five-sixths of the membership was present.

As originally adopted the By-Laws limited the membership of the Lodge to fifty. On September 22, 1857, this limit was increased to 100 members. On November 22, 1861, the limit was again increased to 200 members. At a still later date the limitation was entirely removed.

At the Annual Meeting on November 24, 1857, Bro. Joseph W. Howard was elected and installed as Worshipful Master. We make special mention of this, because Joseph W. Howard, perhaps more than any other one man, was responsible for the organization of Gate of the Temple Lodge. lie loved the Lodge and his loyalty to it never faltered.

Bro. George H. Bartlett, who had so ably served the Lodge as its first Secretary, owing to poor health was forced to relinquish his Office. He went to New Orleans in search of a climate more congenial to his health. The hoped for improvement, however, did not materialize. So with his good wife he went to St. Louis. His condition grew steadily worse, however, and with but one hope in mind they started back to Boston. Being unable to continue the trip, they left the train at Suspension Bridge, N. Y.. and unit to the Monteagle House, operated by Bro. R. D. Cook. The following letter, taken from the Records, sent to Bro. Cook, by vote of the Lodge, reveals one of the noblest acts of true Masonry that has ever come to our attention.

South Boston, 15 Sept. 1858.

R. D. Cook, Esq.,
Monteagle House,
Suspension Bridge, N. Y.

Dear Sir and Brother:

The intelligence of the death of our beloved Brother Geo. H. Bartlett, has filled our hearts with the most poignant feelings of overwhelming grief.

He has long been out of health and about two years since resigned his office as Secretary of this Lodge, relinquished his business, removed hence and established himself in New Orleans. Just on the threshold of prosperity, his health continuing to fail, lie went to St. Louis in quest of a climate thought more congenial to his system. Thence, rapidly sinking, he left for home, only to be cruelly disappointed in the one hope that he then cherished, of seeing, once more upon earth, his family and friends.

Bro. Bartlett was a young man eminent among his fellows in every position which he assumed.
A business man, prompt, systematic, sagacious;
An accountant, finished and peerlessly correct;
A citizen, faithful, upright, hospitable;
A friend, devoted, obliging, generous;
A husband, father, and brother; his loss is a bereavement that no offers of consolation can assuage, no bestowments of this world repair. As a Mason he was "distinguished for his virtues" and was recommended to the favor and protection of the Craft.

We have said this of him, not in eulogy, but that you might know, that in the height of your generosity, you have stopped not to inquire who and what was the man who fell among you a stranger, and whom you afterwards found to be a Brother.

Through the dark clouds of our affliction shines a light which serves to dry up the tears shed over a Brother's grave. Its lustre has impressed upon the sensitive tablets of our hearts, an indelible daguerreotype of one of the most beautiful illustrations of Masonic Charity, that lies within our experience.

We have been touched in a tender place, our feelings of admiration and gratitude prompt us to make all the acknowledgment in our power, for your kindness to our Brother and for the honor you have conferred upon the Fraternity. For he was a stranger and you took him in; sick and you visited him. You stayed to support his drooping head, you felt the last pulsation of his ebbing life, you closed his eyes, the last office of fraternal charity.

More, you sympathized with the destitute and disconsolate widow in her affliction, you inquired out her necessity, you were all to her, in her adversity, that those of kin could be, you accompanied her and was her protector, to her distant home and having seen the remains of our Brother placed with those to whom he belonged; like one of the good spirits of old, hastened away without waiting for thanks, without hope of reward, without waiting for reimbursement of your expenses.

Inasmuch as you have done these things unto him, you have done them unto us. You touched our hearts. You have laid us under a lasting obligation to you. Your acts will be a striking lesson to us. Their record shall be laid up in the archives of our Lodge as a memorial among Masons.

In the unpublished act of doing good, lies the beauty of Masonic charity. In its unassuming secrecy, lies its power over us, while He that seeth in secret rewardeth openly.

We have one more favor to ask of you and that is, that you will furnish us with a statement of your expenses, incurred on behalf of Mrs. Bartlett, in order that we may remit to you the amount, as that is an obligation that we feel duty bound to discharge. Be pleased to make our gratitude known to such of our Masonic Brethren, as were associated with you in these fraternal offices, so that you and they may be encouraged to future acts of Masonic Charity.

Fraternally yours,
Benjamin Pope,
Secretary.

The first time the matter of compensation for any of the Officers appears in the Records of the meeting of February 28, I860, when the Lodge, now five years old, voted to compensate the Secretary and Tyler at the rate of $2.00 per meeting.

At this same meeting (February 28, 1860) Wor. Bro. Joseph W. Howard presented the application of Orlando H. Davenport for the Degrees: little realizing when he presented this petition what it was to mean to this Lodge and this Grand Jurisdiction in the years to come.

On December 11, 1862, the first Public Installation of Officers in this Lodge was held, when Wor. Benj. Pope was installed Master by R. W, Benj. Dean, D. D. G. M.

From the Records under the date of October 14, 1864, we read the following:

This Lodge of Master Masons met in the vestry of the Universalist Church, corner Broadway and B Street at nine o'clock A. M. for the purpose of joining in the procession and witnessing the ceremonies of Laying the Corner Stone of the new Masonic Temple. Sixty-five members appeared and under the escort of St. Paul's Lodge, accompanied by the Metropolitan Brass Band, passed up Fourth Street to Dorchester Street, thence through Broadway, over the bridge to Boston Common. A new and magnificent banner was carried at the head of the Lodge. That banner may be seen hanging in the West.

On December 28, 1864, Bro. John J. Dyer presented to the Lodge a beautiful set of the Three Great Lights, as a token of appreciation and esteem. Although Bro. Dyer never held office in the Lodge, he was very much interested in its welfare and took an active part in its affairs.

The Record of the Annual Meeting of November 28, 1865, contains matter of more than passing interest. The Lodge had just completed the tenth year of its existence. The Civil War had just come to a close. Strange as it may seem, there is not one word in the Records that would indicate that a great war had been in progress. There had been, however, a great increase in the number of applicants for the Degrees during the year just closed. Problems of such importance arose that the Standing Committee, composed of the first three officers, submitted a report reviewing the events of the year.

This, my Brothers, is of particular interest today in view of the fact that we have but recently passed through another great war, with the problems it left behind still fresh in our minds. This report of November 1865, shows very clearly, how history repeats itself.

Report of the Standing Committee. (In part.)

Your Committee respectfully represent that the record of our Work for the past year, affords important subjects for reflection to every member of the Lodge. First, that with a membership of 119 in November 1864, we have increased in membership nearly 30%, double if not treble, the increase of any previous year. Second, that the application for Degrees, received and considered by the Lodge, amount to over 50% of our membership a year ago; in view of which your committee are impressed to enquire of the Lodge, "are we making a healthy growth?" Can every Brother truly say, "I sought admission of my own free will and accord," "that I was uninfluenced by friend or unworthy motives and was actuated by a sincere wish of being serviceable to my fellow men." We have faith to believe such has been the case (deeply regretting the fact if not so) and at a late visit of the Right Worshipful D. D. G. M., took occasion to assure him that we all felt sure that material wrought during the past year and added to our work, would do us credit; and we hold it to be the ambition of those Brethren, that they see to it that our hopes are well founded and our expectations in them, realized. We have now a large membership, many new and competent Brethren, upon whom the future cares and responsibilities of the Lodge must rest. The committee and the Lodge look with ardent hopes, to the Brothers to come up and help us in the various duties that must at some time devolve upon them. If this expectation is realized, then indeed have we done good Work and the result will redound to the credit of the Lodge, which we have so much at heart, and the Fraternity in general.

Brethren, let the work of the coming year be such as will do us credit, let us hold it to be our first duty that every candidate is not only worthy and well qualified, but has higher claims than ourselves, even, to enjoy the privileges of the Order. We recommend a more severe and a more scrutinizing enquiry into claims of the candidates and a more faithful performance of the duties of the Committees on Applicants, upon whose report the Lodge relies with such confidence and faith, (etc.)

Signed

  • Benj. T. Wells, W. M.
  • Benj. F. Smith, S. W.
  • R. M. Barker, J. W.

As we read between the lines of this report the implied question as to the quality of some of the material they have taken into the Lodge, it may be of interest to note that from that large class of candidates came Wor. Theodore L. Kelly and Bro. Timothy Wheater, two of the finest Masonic characters this Lodge has ever known.

On May 24, 1866, the Lodge went to Abington to conduct the Masonic Burial Service over the remains of one of our late Brothers. They were met at the station by the Brethren of John Cutler Lodge, of Abington, who acted as escort and assisted in every way possible. In appreciation of the courtesies extended, Gate of the Temple Lodge later presented to John Cutler Lodge a gavel and a pair of truncheons, and these implements are still used by the Master and Wardens of that Lodge.

Gate of the Temple Lodge, together with the other Masonic Bodies meeting in South Boston, moved on May 30, 1866, to Lyceum Hall, which stood at the corner of Broadway and E Street, the site of our present Apartments. The new Apartments were dedicated according to Masonic usage and custom by the M. W. Grand Master Charles C. Dame and Officers of the Grand Lodge. The expense of fitting up these apartments amounted to $5463.48, which was equally divided among the five Masonic Bodies occupying them. The Gate's share was $1092.69 which was paid in full from the treasury of the Lodge, no assessment upon the Members being necessary.

Apparently our early Brothers enjoyed a good time occasionally, as we do today, for in the Records of May 30. 1866, we read: "A committee was appointed to arrange for the Annual Fishing Excursion of the Lodge." Unfortunately the committee's report is not recorded, so that we have no information about the catch.

On June 24, 1867, the Lodge joined with St. Paul's Lodge to attend the dedication of the new Masonic Temple in Boston. St. Omer Encampment acted as escort.

Up to this time in our history there had been several occasions when the Lodge had been invited by the Grand Lodge to attend various public events, such as corner-stone layings and dedications. Being small in membership, the Lodge had hesitated about appearing publicly as a body but an invitation was invariably forthcoming from St. Paul's, our Mother Lodge, to join with them in attending and these invitations were always accepted. During our early existence St. Paul's Lodge co-operated with and assisted the Gate in every way possible and no Lodge ever had a more faithful and loyal Mother Lodge than Gate of the Temple had in St. Paul's Lodge.

The Regular Communication of April 28, 1868, was called to order by the Senior Warden, Bro. Joseph H. Tapley, who informed the Lodge that their beloved Master Henry A. Drake had passed away suddenly on the preceding day. This is the only time in the history of the Lodge that the presiding Master was removed by death.

At the Regular Communication of February 23, 1869, it was moved and voted; that in the future the Ballot Box shall be placed on the Altar and every Brother, when voting shall approach the Altar under the Due Guard and Sign of a Master Mason and then deposit his ballot." This method of balloting has been used in the Lodge ever since that time.

The Official Visitation on October 26, 1869, was made by Rt. Wor. Benj. Pope, District Deputy Grand Master for the Third Masonic District and a Past Master of Gate of the Temple Lodge. Bro. Pope served as District Deputy Grand Master during 1869, 1870, and 1871, and this Lodge at that time was included in the Third (Boston Highlands) District.

On January 24, 1871, Bro. Theo. L. Kelly moved and it was voted; that a committee be appointed to consider the advisability of petitioning the Grand Lodge for permission to change the location of the meeting place of the Lodge to the city proper. This committee on February 28, 1871, reported to the effect that out of a membership of 155 only about 49 resided in South Boston and assumed that by moving to the city proper 106 members or more than two-thirds of the membership would be better accommodated. The Lodge voted to petition for permission to move, but later reconsidered and appointed a committee to confer with like committees from the other Bodies meeting in the Apartments in reference to securing suitable Apartments. This action was necessary, as the building in which Lyceum Hall was located was about to be torn down to make room for a building to be erected by the South Boston Savings Bank.

The joint committee from the several Bodies arranged with the South Boston Savings Bank to lease the two upper floors of their new building and thus our present Apartments came into existence. They were first used by Gate of the Temple Lodge on June 25, 1872.

When Lyceum Hall was torn down, the Lodge met in the Masonic Temple, Boston from April 25, 1871 to May 28, 1872.

March 23, 1875, a beautifully bound volume of the Holy Bible was presented to the Lodge by Bro. Elisha P. Thayer. This is the Bible that we are using on the Altar at the present time.

The Seal of the Lodge was adopted on May 25, 1875. by adding the following to the By-Laws as Article 12.

"The Seal of Gate of the Temple Lodge shall be a representation of the Porch of Solomon's Temple, within a circle, with Globes upon the Pillars on either hand. Above this Porch a representation of the All Seeing Eye and beneath the Square and Compasses. Around the whole the inscription ' Gate of the Temple Lodge, Boston, Mass., A.L. 5855'.

At the Annual Meeting November 23, 1875, Wor. Theodore L. Kelly for the first time installed the Officers of the Lodge, a duty he continued to perform for thirty-four consecutive years. With but one or two exceptions he was assisted on these occasions by Wor. Thos. H. Harding as Marshal.

On November 25, 1879, Bro. Joseph R. Grose was elected and installed as Master of the Lodge and we take this opportunity to pay tribute to his memory. Probably no one in this Lodge ever performed a more noble and unselfish service among sick and distressed Brethren and their families than he. He made it his duty to follow up these cases and many a burden was lightened and son-owing heart made glad through his kindly services.

The Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Lodge was celebrated on March 18, 1880. There were present about three hundred, including members and their families and guests.

Music for the occasion was furnished by Tom Carter's Orchestra and Bro. Tom Carter is probably the only one alive today who was present on that night.

The first Life Membership Diplomas for twenty-five years membership issued in this Lodge were presented by Wor. Thomas L. Kelly to Bro. Ezra Barlow, William B. Holbrook, and Owen Huff.

The following sentiment was expressed at the closing of this celebration: Thus has passed off the Silver Anniversary of the dear old Gate. In twenty-five years of Opening and Closing, it has not fallen from its hinges or broken its bars. Occasionally one of the Slats drops out, but its place is immediately filled by another and makes a complete and happy whole. May its Silver Hinges, just furnished, retain their brightness, till in due time, it shall swing on Golden ones. And though we may not have the good fortune to be present at that time, there are those present, no doubt, on this occasion who will: and to them are confided the interests of the Lodge, in time to come.

In 1883 the Masonic Districts were reorganized and Gate of the Temple Lodge became part of the Fourth Masonic District.

Bro. James A. Cook was elected and installed Master on November 25, 1890. It is an interesting fact to Members of the Gate that on the same night application for the decrees were received from Fred Clifford Garvin and Arthur Henry Shedd.

At the 42nd Anniversary on March 18, 1897, a portrait of Wor. Bro. Theodore L. Kelly was presented to the Lodge by the Members. This is the portrait that now hangs in the East of our Lodge Room.

From the Secretary's Annual Report, rendered November 23, 1897, we learn that with a Membership of 251, there had been an average attendance, during the year, of 128.

At the Communication of October 25, 1898, Most Wor. Charles C. Hutchinson, Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts, entered the Lodge in an informal manner and entirely unexpectedly. He was very cordially welcomed by the Worshipful Master Bertram D. Amsden and the Brethren.

On October 2-L 1899, an Official Visitation was made by Rt. Wor. John A. McKim, District Deputy Grand Master for the Fourth Masonic District. He was assisted in his work on this occasion by Wor. Frederic A. Flanders as District Deputy Senior Grand Warden, Wor. Elmir Millett as District Deputy Junior Grand Warden, Wor. Herbert M. Dodge as District Deputy Grand Treasurer, and Wor. William F. Schallenbach as District Deputy Grand Secretary. Although more than thirty years have elapsed since that date, all of these Brethren are still active workers in and for the Fraternity. Three of them are present tonight.

Regular Communication February 27, 1900: Most Worshipful Charles T. Gallagher, Grand Master, paid the Lodge a Fraternal Visit.

At the Annual Meeting on November 27, 1900, Brother Fred C. Garvin was elected and installed as Master of the Lodge and he appointed as Marshal Bro. Alexander Simpson, who still continues to serve the Lodge in that capacity and is now serving his thirtieth consecutive year as Marshal of the Lodge. Bro. Simpson has held office in this Lodge longer than any other Brother in its history.

On September 24,1901. the Worshipful Master announced the death of Bro. Ezra Harlow, a Charter Member and the last of the signers of the Original Agreement that resulted in the organization of Gate of the Temple Lodge.

The Fiftieth Anniversary of the Lodge was celebrated on March 28, 1905, Wor. Charles F. Bamberger, Master. The Marshal was, of course, Bro. Alexander Simpson and the following Brethren, now all Past Masters of the Lodge and all of whom are present tonight, occupied stations in the line; John Halbritter, Junior Warden, Olaf Olsen, Senior Deacon, Geo. L. Cook, Senior Steward, Theo. L. Kelly, Jr., Junior Steward (our present treasurer), and C. Sumner Emerson, Inside Sentinel.

There were present Most Worshipful Baalis Sanford, Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts and suite; 182 Members (17 of whom were present at the 25th Anniversary) and 88 visitors. During the exercises, the Charter of the Lodge was read by Wor. Thos. H. Harding, the History of the Lodge by Rev. Bro. James Huxtable. The Address of the evening was made by the Most Worshipful Grand Master Baalis Sanford and it was indeed an eloquent and inspiring Masonic address.

The following Brothers, who had been Members of the Lodge for more than forty years, were present; Orlando H. Davenport, James Middleton, Walter W. Boyden, .John W. Crowell, Zachariah Handcock, Wor. Alban S. Green, and Adoniram J. Hathaway.

At the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge in December 1906, The Gate was honored by the appointment of one of its Past Masters, Rt. Wor. Fred C. Garvin as District Deputy Grand Master for the Fourth Masonic District. At his Official Visitation to the Lodge on October 22, 1907, Rt. Wor. Bro. Garvin was presented with a desk, chair, and bookcase by his many friends in the Lodge as a token of their respect and esteem.

March 23, 1909. The Master informed the Lodge that a daguerreotype of the Officers of 1857 had been given to the Lodge by the children of our late Bro. Geo. H. Bartlett our first Secretary. Included in the group of Officers in this picture, are five of our Charter Members.

April 27, 1909, was observed as Wheater Night in honor of Bro. Timothy Wheater, who for 43 years had been an active, loyal worker in the Lodge. Three of the candidates Raised to the Sublime Degree, on that night, were Bro. Wheater's Son, Grandson, and Nephew.

On November 10, 1910, we lost by death Wor. Theodore L. Kelly, who for over forty-four years had been one of the outstanding members of the Lodge. Loyal, able, eloquent, he gave to the Lodge unselfishly of his talents, and his memory will ever be cherished among us.

The following appears in the Records of May 26, 1914, Wor. C. Sumner Emerson, Master. The most pleasing feature of the evening was the introduction by Wor. James A. Cook, of our oldest Member in point of membership Bro. Orlando H. Davenport: and his reception by the Worshipful Master and Members." Bro. Davenport became a Member of the Lodge on May 22, 1860, thus completing fifty-four years of membership tonight.

At the Regular Communication on January 26, 1915, the Wor. Master announced the death of Bro. Orlando H. Davenport on January 11, 1915. He also informed the Lodge that a large trust had been committed to the Lodge, Bro. Davenport having left to Gate of the Temple Lodge by his will one-fifth of his estate, to be used for charitable purposes.

On May 25, 1915, the Wor. Master presented Bros. James Middleton and Timothy Wheater with Membership Aprons; they having been Members of the Lodge for more than fifty years.

On this same evening a Memorial Service was held in honor of the memory of Bro. Orlando H. Davenport. Remarks on his life and character were made by M. W. Melvin M. Johnson, Grand Master, and Wor. Edward A. Horton, Grand Chaplain.

On the evening of May 22. 1917, Wor. Bro. Alton S. Green and Bros. Timothy Wheater, James Middleton, and John W. Crowell, all of whom had been Members of the Lodge for more than fifty years, were presented with Henry Price Medals in appreciation of their long and honorable service to the Fraternity. The presentation was made by Wor. Harry H. Ham.

On motion of Bro. Guy A. Ham, it was voted that the Master and Wardens be empowered to invest such sums of the Lodge funds as may seem prudent in Liberty Loan Bonds of the United States.

June 26, 1917. On motion of Bro. Guy A. Ham, it was voted that the Lodge remit the dues of Members who enlist in the Service of the United States or the Allies, during the War.

November 26, 1918. The Worshipful Master called the attention of the Lodge to the death of Bro. Hugh Gray who was killed in action at Vergennes, France, October 20, 1918. Bro. Gray was the only member of the Lodge to be killed in action during the War. Forty-one Members of the Lodge were, during the War, in the Service of this Country or its Allies.

On October 27, 1925, a Memorial Service was held in honor of the memory of Wor. Bro. James A. Cook, who passed away on July 7, 1925. For forty-four years he had been an earnest worker for the welfare of the Lodge and ever ready to extend a helping hand to a deserving and needy Brother.

At the Communication of January 26, 1926, the Lodge paid tribute to our beloved Marshal, Bro. Alexander Simpson, who had served the Lodge as its Marshal for twenty-five years. Fourteen of the Past Masters under whom he had served were present and Rt. Wor. Fred C. Garvin, in behalf of the Lodge, presented Bro. Simpson with a replica of the Lodge Baton, suitably inscribed and bearing the names of the twenty Masters he had served under.

On May 23, 1926, the Lodge suffered a great loss by the death of Wor. Guy A. Ham, one of our most distinguished members. He had given freely of his time and talents, for the welfare of the Lodge and had served as its Master during the War. His eloquent voice, his cheerful smile, and his wise counsel will long be missed at our meetings.

On September 16, 1926, the Lodge again lost by death one of its active workers, when our ever faithful and loyal Treasurer, Bro. Arthur Henry Shedd, was called Home. Two days later more than twenty of our officers and members journeyed to York Village, Maine, and there performed the last Rites of our Order over his remains. Bro. Shedd had served the Lodge as its Treasurer for twenty-three years. During the seventy-five years since its organization, Gate of the Temple Lodge has had forty-eight Worshipful Masters. In the early days the Masters generally served in the East for two years. Two Masters, Wor. Bros. Pope and Wells, served three years each. For several years past, however, no Master has served for more than one year.

The office of Treasurer has been filled by but seven different Brethren.

The Lodge was organized with sixteen Charter Members. At the end of ten years our membership was 146. At the time of our Twenty-fifth Anniversary the membership was 143. At the Fiftieth Anniversary the membership had grown to 323. The number of members increased rapidly with the great influx of candidates immediately following the War and reached its peak on November 25, 1924 with a membership of 716. Since that date it has fallen off somewhat until today at this seventy-fifth anniversary our membership is 691.

The Lodge has always been a charitable Lodge and the frequency with which references to relief cases appear in the Records well testifies to the fact that it has always been the ardent desire of the Lodge to permit no worthy case to pass unnoticed.

The outstanding characteristic of Gate of the Temple Lodge is what we know as the "Gate Spirit." Our early Brethren planted here the spirit of harmony and co-operation, of friendliness and brotherly love, and that spirit has ever characterized our gatherings; it holds the members by its mystic charm and welcomes the visitors and strangers amongst us, with the warmth of a cordial and friendly fraternal greeting.

Thus we stand on the threshold of the last quarter of the century and look forward with hope and courage to the duties that beckon us on. Under the guidance of the Grand Architect, may we go forward, with a firm determination to live nearer to the lofty ideals for which the Fraternity stands.

CENTENARY HISTORY, MARCH 1955

From Proceedings, Page 1955-70:

By Right Worshipful Frank L. Cushing.

We have assembled to celebrate the one hundredth anniversary of Gate of the Temple Lodge, and it is fitting on such an occasion that we should turn back the pages of history and review some of the events that have occurred during this Masonic experience with the hope that we may there find stepping stones upon which to build a greater Masonic tomorrow.

During the 1850's there was a marked revival of interest in Freemasonry, and it was in that period twelve men interested in forming a new Masonic Lodge in South Boston were brought together through the efforts of Joseph W. Howard. They drew up and signed the following "Original Agreement":

We the undersigned, hereby agree to lend our aid and support, toward forming a New Lodge of Free and Accepted Ancient York Masonry in South Boston and, if possible, we agree to attend the meeting that will be called to take the subject into consideration. Which meeting shall be duly notified to the signers and none others shall attend.

Signed by Brothers:

  • Richard M. Barker.
  • William E. Jackson
  • Isaac T. Campbell
  • George H. Bartlett
  • James F. G. Baxter
  • Joseph H. Clinch
  • William J. Radford
  • Joseph W. Howard
  • Samuel R. Spinney
  • John S. H. Fogg
  • Ezra Harlow
  • Edwin B. Spinney

They met for the first preliminary meeting at the home of Brother Howard, 151 Broadway, South Boston, on the evening of February 28, 1855, to discuss plans for organization. Committees were appointed to consider the matter of a name for the new Lodge, secure a meeting place, secure regalia, and prepare a request for a dispensation. It was voted that Rev. Joseph H. Clinch be considered for the first Master on account of his standing in the community, and a committee was appointed to urge him to accept. Bro. George H. Bartlett was elected to act as Secretary. Other preliminary meetings were held on March 7, 10 and 15, all at the home of Bro. Howard.

It was voted to admit the five following men to the organization as Charter Members: Jacob C. Phelps, Thomas M. Spinney, William B. Holbrook, John W. F. Willson and Alexander McDonald. Bro. Clinch agreed to serve as the first Master and they proceeded to elect the following to serve as officers: Richard M. Barker, Senior Warden; Samuel R. Spinney, Junior Warden; James F. G. Baxter, Treasurer; George H. Bartlett, Secretary.

The fourth Tuesday of each month was selected as the meeting night. The committee appointed to select a name for the new Lodge reported that they had decided upon the name "Trinity," which was approved, but later reconsidered. It was found that there already was a "Trinity" Lodge and the name "Gate of the Temple" was adopted, it being more individual and more distinctive.

The request for a dispensation was prepared with Rev. Joseph H. Clinch named as the first Worshipful Master, and signed by all seventeen members as Charter Members. The application was submitted to Most Worshipful Winslow Lewis, Grand Master, accompanied by a letter of recommendation and approval from Saint Paul's Lodge and a letter of approval from the District Deputy Grand Master of the First Masonic District. The dispensation was issued by the Grand Master under date of March 15, 1855, which is the date of our precedence.

Arrangements were completed with Saint Paul's Lodge for the use of their lodge-room. The fee for the degrees was set at $25.00.

The first Regular Communication was held in "Masonick" Hall, Broadway and B Street, South Boston, on March 27, 1855, under the following organization:

  • Wor. Richard M. Barker, Master
  • Bro. Joseph W. Howard, Senior Warden
  • Bro. Samuel R. Spinney, Junior Warden
  • Bro. James F. G. Baxter, Treasurer
  • Bro. George H. Bartlett, Secretary
  • Bro. Edwin B. Spinney, Marshal
  • Bro. Jacob C. Phelps, Senior Deacon
  • Bro. Ezra Harlow, Junior Deacon
  • Bro. William J. Radford, Senior Steward
  • Bro. Thomas M. Spinney, Junior Steward
  • Bro. William B. Holbrook, Inner Sentinel
  • Bro. J. McFarland, Tyler

It is interesting to note that there were no Institution Ceremonies such as is customary today. The first five officers had been elected at a preliminary meeting and at this first meeting they balloted for the remaining officers with the following results:

  • Bro. Alexander McDonald, Marshal
  • Bro. Jacob C. Phelps, Senior Deacon
  • Bro. Ezra Harlow, Junior Deacon
  • Bro. William J. Radford, Senior Steward
  • Bro. Thomas M. Spinney, Junior Steward
  • Bro. William B. Holbrook, Inner Sentinel

All officers were originally elected by ballot; none were appointed by the Master. At this first meeting four applications for the degrees were received from the following: Stephen W. Goodhue, Henry C. Harden, Daniel Briscoe and Freeman M. Josselyn, Jr.

The second Regular Communication was held on April 24, 1855, at which time the four men whose applications had been received in March were elected and received as Entered Apprentices. At the Regular Communication of May 22, 1855, the committee on apartments reported that they had completed arrangements with Saint Paul's Lodge for the continued use of their apartments in "Masonick" Hall for a rental of $100.00 for twelve regular meetings and $7.00 per night for special meetings. Bro. Samuel R. Spinney presented to the Lodge a complete set of collars and jewels for the officers, and the Lodge passed a vote of thanks and appreciation for his kind gift.

The first Special Communication was held on June 19, 1855, when the Lodge worked the Third Degree for the first time and the four original candidates were raised to the Sublime Degree of Master Mason. At the Regular Communication of March 25, 1856, applications for membership were received from thirteen Brothers who had been raised in the Lodge during the past year. The request for a Charter was approved on March 12, 1856, and we quote from the records as follows:

March 25, 1856. The object of this Communication being the Consecration of the Lodge and the Installation of the Officers.

The ceremonies were conducted by the Officers of the Grand Lodge, Most Worshipful Winslow Lewis, Grand Master.

After the Lodge was consecrated, the first five officers were installed as follows:

  • Wor. Richard M. Barker, Master
  • Bro. Joseph W. Howard, Senior Warden
  • Bro. Samuel R. Spinney, Junior Warden
  • Bro. James F. G. Baxter, Treasurer
  • Bro. George H. Bartlett, Secretary

On September 17, 1856, the Lodge joined with Saint Paul's Lodge to participate in the public procession and service for the unveiling of the statue of Benjamin Franklin in Boston. The first visitation by a District Deputy was at the communication of October 28, 1856, when, according to the records, "A deputation from the Grand Lodge appeared, headed by Clement A. Walker, D. D. G. M., for the purpose of inspecting the By-Laws, Records and Work and to receive the Annual Returns of the Lodge."

At the Annual Meeting on November 25, 1856, a communication was received from Bro. George H. Bartlett, resigning as Secretary because of ill health and absence from home. Bro. Benjamin Pope was elected Secretary in his place. Wor. Richard M. Barker was re-elected Master. During the balloting for officers, Wor. Joseph H. Clinch presided in the East and then installed Richard M. Barker as Master. Wor. Bro. Barker then installed the other officers. Although Rev. Bro. Clinch had been Master of the Lodge under dispensation, this is the only time, according to the records, that he actually presided in the East.

On invitation of the Grand Lodge, the Gate again joined with Saint Paul's Lodge, on June 17, 1857, to attend the ceremonies of the unveiling of the statue of General Joseph Warren at Bunker Hill, Charlestown.

The by-laws originally limited the membership of the Lodge to fifty members. On September 22, 1857, an amendment offered by Bro. Joseph W. Howard, raising this limitation to one hundred, was unanimously adopted. At the Annual Communication of November 26, 1857, Wor. Joseph W. Howard, who had been responsible for the organization of Gate of the Temple Lodge, was elected and installed as Master. On December 22, 1857, Most Worshipful John T. Heard, Grand Master, honored 
the Lodge with a fraternal visit.

We have already referred to the resignation of Bro. George H. Bartlett as Secretary because of ill health. He had gone to New Orleans in hopes that the milder climate would be beneficial. This not being the case, however, he sought relief in St. Louis. He grew steadily worse, until late in the summer of 1858, accompanied by his wife, with but one hope in view, they
started for Boston. Too sick to continue, they were forced to 
leave the train at Suspension Bridge, New York. They went 
to the Monteagle Hotel, operated by R. D. Cook, a member of
the Craft. There Bro. Bartlett passed away a few days later.
Bro. Cook voluntarily accompanied the bereaved widow and
our Brother's remains to Boston, saw her safely back in the home
of relatives and then quietly retired and returned home.

By vote of the Lodge, the Secretary wrote to Bro. Cook, thanking him for the kindly aid rendered to our late Brother and his bereaved widow and requesting him to let them know the amount of the expense to which he had been put that the Lodge might reimburse him. Bro. Cook acknowledged the letter under date of October 4, 1858, thanking the Lodge for its generous expression of appreciation, but added that he had only done his duty as a Mason as he saw it and did not expect or want to be reimbursed in any way. On this anniversary occasion, we are again proud to pay tribute to the memory of Brother R. B. Cook as a true exemplar of the spirit of Freemasonry.

On August 2, 1859, the Lodge joined with Saint Paul's Lodge on an excursion to Plymouth to participate in the ceremonies incident to the laying of the cornerstone of the Pilgrim Monument. At the communication of February 28, 1860, Wor. Joseph W. Howard presented an application for the degrees from Orlando H. Davenport. Bro. Davenport was initiated on March 27, 1860, passed April 24, 1860, and raised on April 25, 1860. He was elected to membership on May 22, 1860.

Bro. Stephen W. Goodhue, who was the first man to be elected to receive the degrees and the first man to be raised in the Lodge, was elected and installed as Master on November 22, 1859. The Regular Communication of April 1860 was called to order by the Senior Warden, Edwin Tilden, who informed the Lodge that their Master had suddenly moved to St. Louis and did not intend to return. Wor. Bro. Goodhue did not resign as Master; so the Senior Warden acted as Master until the Annual Meeting in November.

At the Annual Communication November 28, 1862, Wor. Benjamin Pope was elected Master for a second term. He was installed at a public installation on December 11, 1862, by R. W. Benjamin Dean, D. D. G. M. After the installation the members and their guests proceeded to the banquet-hall where a program of refreshments, entertainment and dancing was provided.

Upon invitation from the Grand Master, the Lodge assembled in the vestry of the Universalist Church on October 14,1864, and joined in procession with Saint Paul's Lodge, and, headed by the Metropolitan Brass Band, marched up Fourth Street to Dorchester to Broadway and thence across the bridge to Boston Common to participate in the ceremonies of the laying of the corner-stone of the new Masonic Temple at Tremont and Boylston Streets. A new and magnificent banner was carried at the head of the Lodge.

At the Annual Communication of November 22, 1864, the by-laws were changed increasing the limitation on membership from one hundred to two hundred members and the fee for the degrees was increased from $25.00 to $35.00. The limitation on membership was removed entirely a few years later.

On December 28, 1864, the Lodge received as a gift from Bro. John J. Dyer a beautiful set of the Three Great Lights, accompanied by the following letter:

To the Worshipful Master, Officers and Brethren of Gate of the Temple Lodge.

Please accept these Three Great Lights of Masonry as a token of the esteem and a practical return for the many acts of kindness received at your hands. Trusting that they may be the means of guiding the "worthy and well qualified to Light, Knowledge and Truth." With best wishes and kindest regards

I am Yours fraternally
John J. Dyer

At the Annual Communication of November 28, 1865, the Master and Wardens, as the Standing Committee, read a signed report, viewing with alarm the great influx of applicants for the degrees, questioning if all were worthy and well qualified and if the investigating committees were making a careful investigation. The membership that year had increased from 119 in November 1864 to 146 in November 1865. We note with interest that although they implied in their report that some of the members accepted that year were not qualified, we note with pride that among others in that class of candidates were Wor. Theodore L. Kelly and Bro. Timothy Wheater, two of the finest Masonic characters this Lodge has ever known.

On May 24, 1866, the Lodge went to Abington to conduct a Masonic funeral service for one of our departed Brothers. They were met at the station by members of John Cutler Lodge, who acted as an escort and assisted in every way possible. In appreciation of the courtesies extended, Gate of the Temple Lodge presented to John Cutler Lodge a gavel and pair of truncheons, and these implements are still used by the Master and Wardens of that Lodge.

The quarters at "Masonick" Hall used by all the bodies meeting in South Boston had become entirely inadequate. A committee was appointed with representatives from all bodies to find a new meeting place. They were successful in securing new quarters in Lyceum Hall, Broadway and E Street, South Boston. On May 30, 1866, a joint meeting of Saint Paul's, Gate of the Temple and Adelphi Lodges was called to order with Wor. Bro. White of Saint Paul's in the East, Wor. Bro. Pope of the Gate in the West, Wor. Bro. Hill of Adelphi in the South, and Wor. Bro. Barker of the Gate as Marshal. They received a delegation from the Grand Lodge headed by the Grand Master, M. W. Charles C. Dame. The Grand Master and his Officers assumed the various stations and consecrated the apartments in Due and Ancient Form. The total cost of equipping the apartments was $5463.48, of which the Gate's share was $1092.69, which was paid in full from the treasury.

On June 26, 1866, it was called to the attention of the Lodge that the widow of our late Secretary, Bro. George H. Bartlett, was in need of $200.00 a year to aid in supporting her two daughters. The Lodge voted to donate $100.00 and the members subscribed the balance.

On December 25, 1866, a petition was presented by Wor. Benjamin Pope, on behalf of twenty-two members, praying for permission to organize a new Lodge in South Boston. It was voted to approve the request upon their asking for their demits.

On June 24, 1867, the Gate joined with Saint Paul's Lodge in attending the dedication ceremonies of the new Masonic Temple. They marched to Boston under the escort of St. Omer Commandery. The Grand Lodge had voted to impose a Commutation Tax of $13.00 per member and twenty-five cents per visit to a Lodge for unaffiliated Masons to cover the indebtedness incurred in building the new temple. On September 24, 1867, the Gate voted to assess the members $1.00 per year for thirteen years to cover this Commutation Tax and that the twenty-five cents per visit for unaffiliated Masons be assumed by the Lodge.

On December 24, 1867, the Worshipful Master presented to Wor. Richard M. Barker a watch and chain on behalf of the members in appreciation of his faithful services to the Lodge, and to Bro. James F. G. Baxter, Treasurer, he presented, on behalf of the members, a silver loving cup as a testimonial of their respect and brotherly love.

The communication of April 28, 1868, was called to order by the Senior Warden, Bro. Joseph W. Tapley, who informed the Lodge that their beloved Master, Henry A. Drake, had passed away suddenly on the preceding day. On May 26, 1868, by dispensation, a special election was held and Joseph W. Tapley was elected and installed as Master until the next Annual Meeting.

The Gate was originally included in the First Masonic District. The Districts were revamped in the late 60's and Gate of the Temple Lodge became part of the Third "Boston Highlands" District, which included the Lodges in South Boston, Dorchester, Roxbury and East Boston, and Rural Lodge in Quincy.

A petition was received from twenty-two members on February 22, 1870, asking for their demits as they were about to petition the Grand Lodge for a Charter for Rabboni Lodge. It was voted that the Secretary be instructed to issue the demits, when they were clear on the books. The Junior Warden, Samuel Evans, moved that "being clear on the books" included the balance of $7.00 due on the Commutation Tax. The Master ruled that the motion was out of order, whereupon Bro. Evans appealed the ruling to the Grand Lodge and was sustained.

A commutation was received from the Grand Lodge on October 24, 1871, asking for contributions to aid Brethren rendered destitute by the great fire in Chicago. The Lodge voted to contribute $100.00 to the relief fund.

In 1870 the South Boston Savings Bank purchased Lyceum Hall for the purpose of erecting a new bank building on the site. A committee was appointed to act with like committees from the other bodies to secure new quarters. Gate of the Temple Lodge met in Egyptian Hall, Masonic Temple, Boston, from April 25, 1871, to May 28, 1872, while Lyceum Hall was being demolished and the new bank building erected. The joint committee on apartments succeeded in arranging with the South Boston Savings Bank to have the third and fourth floors of their new building finished as Masonic Apartments. The rental for the apartments was set at $1450.00 per year, to be divided equally among the five bodies meeting there, the expense of heating the apartments to be paid by the tenants.

On motion by Bro. Joseph R. Grose on January 28, 1873, it was voted that a committee of five be appointed "whose duty it shall be to visit all members of the Lodge who are reported sick or in need and report back to the Lodge at the next regular meeting." Bro. Grose made the motion and was, of course, appointed as a member and remained on the committee until his death. A man of a kindly and sympathetic nature, he won the affection and respect of every member of the Lodge for the faithful manner in which he ministered to the sick and needy. On March 23, 1875, a beautifully bound volume of the Holy Bible was presented to the Lodge by Bro. Elisha F. Thayer. On Sunday, May 28, 1876, a Special Communication was opened in the apartments for the purpose of paying their last respects to our beloved founder, VVor. Joseph W. Howard. The members were taken by coaches to the entrance of Mt. Hope Cemetery, where they formed as an escort and marched with the body to its final resting place. The solemn Masonic burial service was performed at the grave.

The twenty-fifth anniversary was celebrated on March 18, 1880, Wor. Joseph R. Grose, Master. It was an open meeting and seventy members, their families and friends were present, about three hundred in all. The Master delivered an address of welcome and an historical address was read. Wor. Theodore R. Kelly presented Life Membership Certificates to Bro. Ezra Harlow, William B. Holbrook and Owen Huff. In closing, one of the guests expressed the following sentiments:

Thus has passed off the Silver Anniversary of the dear old Gate. In twenty-five years of opening and closing, it has not fallen from its hinges or broken its bars. Occasionally one of the "Slats" drops out, but its place is immediately filled by another, which keeps together its parts and makes a complete and happy whole. May its Silver Hinges, just furnished, retain their brightness, until in due time it shall swing on golden ones. And although we may not have the good fortune to be present, there are those present, no doubt, who will, and to them are confided the interests of the Lodge in time to come.

At the conclusion of the ceremonies in the lodge-room, the company proceeded to the banquet hall, where they danced until 2:00 a.m. Music was furnished by Tom Carter's Orchestra.

The Lodge was honored on May 24, 1881, by a fraternal visit from Most Worshipful Samuel Crocker Lawrence, Grand Master, accompanied by Right Worshipful Charles T. Gallagher as Grand Marshal. There were about three hundred members and visitors present. M. W. Bro. Lawrence spoke eloquently on the activities of the Craft. At the close of the meeting, they repaired to the banquet-hall, where a delightful dinner was served.

At the communication of September 27, 1881, the Master, Joseph R. Grose, and others spoke feelingly of the death of Bro. James Abram Garfield, President of the United States, and a memorial page was set apart in the records to his memory.

At the Annual Meeting, November 22, 1881, the Master, Wor. Samuel M. Bedlington, presented to the retiring Master, Wor. Joseph R. Grose, a Past Master's Jewel and a silver tea set of seven pieces on behalf of the members, as a token of their appreciation of his sixteen years of faithful service to the Lodge and its members.

On January 24, 1882, the Lodge voted to purchase a sewing machine for the widow of our late Brother Joseph W. Howard, the better to enable her to support herself and daughters.

In 1883 the Masonic Districts were again reorganized, and the Gate became part of the Fourth Masonic District. At the Annual Meeting of November 27, 1888, Wor. John Kinnear was elected and installed as Master. Bro. Kinnear, with substantial facts to qualify, claimed to be the first volunteer to the Union Army in the Civil War. On November 25, 1890, Wor. James A. Cook was elected and installed as Master of the Lodge. At this meeting applications for the degrees were received from Fred Clifford Garvin and Arthur Henry Shedd, both of whom were to serve the Lodge long and faithfully in the days to come.

Our beloved Past Master, Wor. Joseph Randell Grose, passed away on August 18, 1892. A Masonic funeral service was held in Phillips Church. There was a large attendance of members and friends present to pay their last respects to the memory of this humble man who had loved his fellow men and served them faithfully in life. On October 27, 1896, an application for the degrees was received from Olaf Olsen. He served as Master in 1909 and as Trustee for many years. He has probably attended more meetings of the Gate than any other member and we salute him tonight as our Number One Member. At the forty-second anniversary night, March 18, 1897, a framed portrait of Wor. Theodore R. Kelly was presented to the Lodge by the members. From the records of October 25, 1898, we read:

The Lodge was highly honored this evening by a visit from M.W. Charles H. Hutchinson, Grand Master, who in an informal manner, entered the Lodge entirely unexpectedly. He was cordially welcomed by the Master, who introduced him to the members and visiting brethren. The Grand Master in the course of his remarks complimented the Lodge on its good work and especially praised the excellent records he had just heard read.

Most Worshipful Charles T. Gallagher honored the Lodge with a fraternal visit on February 27, 1900. He complimented the Lodge on its success and expressed appreciation for the quality of the material it was receiving into its membership.

At the Annual Meeting of November 27, 1900, Wor. Fred C. Garvin was elected and installed as Master. The installing officer was Wor. Theodore L. Kelly, assisted by Wor. Thomas H. Harding as Marshal. Bro. Alexander "Sandy" Simpson was installed as Marshal for the first time.

Our Treasurer, Bro. Charles W. Walker, passed away in April 1903, and on May 26, 1903, Bro. Arthur H. Shedd was elected to fill the vacancy. For twenty-three years he filled the office with outstanding ability. The fiftieth anniversary ceremonies were celebrated on March 28,1905, Wor. Charles F. Hamberger, Master. Most Worshipful Baalis Sanford, Grand Master, and suite were present. 182 members and 88 visitors were in attendance. The address of welcome was made by the Worshipful Master. The Charter was read by Wor. Thomas H. Harding and the historical address was delivered by Bro. & Rev. James Huxtable. The address of the evening was delivered by Most Worshipful Baalis Sanford. At the conclusion of the ceremonies in the lodge-room, they repaired to the banquet-hall, where dinner was served by Bro. Henry J. Seiler. Wor. Theodore L. Kelly presided as Toast-master. At the conclusion of the banquet, the sentiments expressed at the twenty-fifth anniversary were given with necessary changes, as follows:

Thus has passed the Golden Anniversary of the dear old Gate; in fifty years of opening and closing it lias not fallen from its hinges or broken its bars. Occasionally one of the "Slats" drops out, but its place is immediately filled by another, which keeps together its parts and makes a complete and happy whole. May its Golden Hinges, just furnished, retain their brightness until in due time it shall swing on diamond ones, and though we may not all have the good fortune to be present at that time, there are those present, no doubt, who will, and to them we confide the interest and welfare of the Lodge in time to come.

On April 24, 1906, an application for the degrees was received from Guy Andrews Ham, who was to serve the Lodge so faithfully and brilliantly in days to come.

On December 28, 1906, the Master called attention to the honor that had come to Gate of the Temple Lodge by the appointment of Right Worshipful Fred C. Garvin as District Deputy Grand Master of the Fourth Masonic District. On the occasion of the Official Visitation on October 22, 1907, the Master, Wor. Robert E. Harrison, presented to R.W. Fred C. Garvin, on behalf of the members, a roll-top desk, chair and bookcase, as a token of their respect and esteem. As soon as R. W. Brother Garvin could recover from the surprise, he replied feelingly, expressing his heartfelt thanks to the members for this expression of friendship and good will.

At the Annual Communication on November 24, 1908, Wor. Olaf Olsen was elected and installed as Master. On January 26, 1909, Right Worshipful William F. Shellenbach informed the Lodge that the proposed Masonic Home was now a reality, as the Masonic Home Committee had purchased the estate in Charlton, known as Overlook, for $50,000. It had cost its former owners $300,000.

On March 23, 1909, the Master announced that the Lodge had received from the daughter of our first Secretary, Bro. George H. Bartlett, a daguerreotype picture of the officers of the Lodge in the early days. Actually the picture was that of the first seven officers of the Lodge at the time it was constituted. April 27, 1909, was celebrated as Wheater Night and the guest of honor was Bro. Timothy Wheater. Among the candidates raised that night were Bro. John Henry Wheater (son), Bro. Harry Louis Wheater (grandson), and Bro. Joe Harry Wheater (nephew).

The Secretary reported on May 24, 1910, that the Lodge had contributed $828.00 to date to the Masonic Home Fund. Wor. Theodore L. Kelly passed away on November 10, 1910. He had installed the officers of the Lodge for thirty-four consecutive years and was one of the outstanding members in the entire history of Gate of the Temple Lodge. We are proud to pay tribute to his memory on this anniversary occasion. From the records of May 26, 1914, Wor. C. Sumner Emerson, Master, we quote the following:

The most pleasing feature of the evening was the introduction by Wor. James A. Cook of our oldest member in point of membership, Bro. Orlando H. Davenport, and his reception by the Master and members. Bro. Davenport became a member of the Lodge on May 22, 1860, completing fifty-four years of membership tonight. He was presented with a beautiful bouquet in token of the affection of the Lodge toward him. Bro. Davenport expressed his appreciation for the warm and kindly reception tendered him. As a climax the members joined in singing one verse of "Old Lang Syne."

On January 26, 1915, the Worshipful Master announced the death of Bro. Orlando H. Davenport on January 11, 1915, and stated that a large trust had been left to the Charity Fund of the Lodge by the will of Bro. Davenport, bequeathing one-fifth of his estate for charitable purposes.

On February 23, 1915, which was celebrated as a Past Masters' Night, the Master requested Bro. William A. Wheater to escort his father, Bro. Timothy Wheater, to the East and there presented to him a bouquet of flowers as a token of the respect and esteem of the Lodge, and also in recognition of the fact fifty years ago tonight that he had taken his first step in Freemasonry in Gate of the Temple Lodge.

On May 25, 1915, the Master presented Brothers Timothy Wheater and James Middleton with membership aprons in recognition of their fifty years of membership in the Lodge.

A Memorial Service was held on May 25, 1915, in honor of the memory of our late Bro. Davenport. The Lodge was honored on this occasion by the presence of Most Worshipful Melvin Maynard Johnson, Grand Master, R. W. Roscoe Pound, Deputy Grand Master, and Wor. Edward A. Horton, Grand Chaplain. M.W. Melvin M. Johnson and Grand Chaplain Edward A. Horton spoke eloquently of the life and deeds of our late Bro. Orlando H. Davenport.

On May 22, 1917, Brothers Timothy Wheater, James Middleton, John W. Crowell and Wor. Alban S. Green were presented with Henry Price Medals in recognition of their more than fifty years of membership and in appreciation of their long and honorable service to the Craft.

On November 26, 1918, the Master called to the attention of the Lodge the death of Bro. Hugh Gray, who was killed in action at Vergennes, France, on October 20, 1918. Bro. Gray was the only member to make the supreme sacrifice in World War I.

A Memorial Service was held on October 27, 1925, in honor of the memory of Wor. James A. Cook. He was raised on June 28, 1881; served as Master in 1891 and 1892; departed July 7, 1925. Through the years, Wor. James A. Cook was one of the most earnest and active members of the Lodge, and was ever ready to extend a helping hand to a deserving and needy Brother.

January 26, 1926, was celebrated as "Sandy Simpson Night" in honor of our beloved Marshal, Bro. Alexander Simpson, and in recognition of his twenty-five years of service as Marshal of the Lodge. "Sandy" as he was affectionately known, had served as Marshal under twenty different Masters, fourteen of whom were present. R.W. Fred C. Garvin, who first appointed Sandy as Marshal, presented to him, on behalf of the members, a replica of the baton he had carried as Marshal, inscribed with names of the Masters under whom he had served.

On May 23, 1926, the Lodge was saddened by the death of one of our most beloved Past Masters, Wor. Guy Andrews Ham. He was without question the most eloquent Master ever to occupy the East of Gate of the Temple Lodge and one who had served both the Lodge and the Fraternity with distinction. On September 16, 1926, our Treasurer, Bro. Arthur Henry Shedd, passed away in York, Maine. He had served the Lodge faithfully as its Treasurer for twenty-three years. On September 18, 1926, twenty-two officers and members went to York and conducted the Masonic funeral service in the First Parish Church in York Village.

In December 1926 the Masonic Districts were again changed, and the Gate became part of the Dorchester Fourth District.

Memorial Services were held on May 24, 1927, to pay honor to the memories of Wor. Guy Andrews Ham, Bro. Arthur Henry Shedd, Wor. Robert E. Harrison and Bro. Andrew F. Green.

The seventy-fifth anniversary ceremonies were held in the Masonic Apartments, 372 Broadway, South Boston, on March 25, 1930. The Grand Lodge Suite attending was headed by R. W. Louis A. Jones, Deputy Grand Master, as Acting Grand Master. Our Grand Master, M. W. Herbert W. Dean, was visiting our Lodges in China at that time. The Suite included R. W. John W. McKim as Senior Grand Warden, R. W. John W. Withington, Junior Grand Warden, R. W. Charles H. Ramsay, Grand Treasurer, and R. W. Frederick W. Hamilton, Grand Secretary. The Charter of the Lodge was read by Wor. Olaf Olsen. The historical address was given by Wor. Frank L. Cushing. R. W. Louis A. Jones congratulated the Lodge on its seventy-five years of Masonic achievement and R. W. Frederick W. Hamilton spoke of Grand Lodge activities of seventy-five years ago and contrasted them with those of the present day, showing the tremendous growth and expansion of activities in this seventy-five year period. In closing, the sentiments expressed at our twenty-fifth anniversary and repeated with necessary changes at our fiftieth anniversary were again expressed with necessary changes by R. W. Fred C. Garvin.

In December 1930 the Lodge was honored by the appointment of R. W. Frank L. Cushing as District Deputy Grand Master of the Dorchester Fourth Masonic District.

Our beloved Marshal, Bro. Alexander Simpson, passed away on January 9, 1931. He had served the Lodge as its Marshal with outstanding distinction for more than thirty years.

On May 25, 1933, the Lodge held a celebration in honor of the two hundredth anniversary of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Massachusetts. R. W. Frederic L. Putnam was the speaker for the occasion.

We lost by death on May 31, 1935, R. W. Fred C. Garvin. He had served as Master in 1901 and 1902 and as District Deputy Grand Master in 1907 and 1908.

The Lodge was honored in December 1948 by the appointment of R. W. Archibald Dresser as District Deputy Grand Master of the Dorchester Fourth District. He served in this office in 1949 and 1950 with distinction to himself and honor to the Lodge.

In 1950 the South Boston Savings Bank sold the building in which our apartments were located and it became necessary to find new quarters. The final meeting in our apartments at 372 Broadway, South Boston, was held on June 27, 1950. These apartments had been our meeting place for seventy-eight years and it was with sadness that we left them. The Lodge voted to move to the Masonic Apartments at 584 Columbia Road, Uphams Corner, Dorchester. It also voted to change the date of the Annual Meeting from the fourth Tuesday in November to the fourth Tuesday in September. The first meeting in the Uphams Corner Apartments was held on September 26, 1950, and by coincidence, it was our first Annual Meeting in September.

Gate of the Temple Lodge was organized in 1855 with seventeen Charter Members. At the twenty-fifth anniversary in 1880, there were 143 members. At its fiftieth anniversary the membership had grown to 323. During World War I the membership grew rapidly until 1924, when there were 716 members. A period of recession followed, but that has now pretty much leveled off. The Annual Return of August 31, 1954, shows a membership of 479.

The founders of Gate of the Temple Lodge implanted here the spirit of friendship and brotherly love. This spirit, known to the members as the "Gate Spirit," has ever been characteristic of our activities. Here both members and visitors always receive a warm and cordial welcome. May this "Gate Spirit" ever be characteristic of all Gate activities. Throughout its history, Gate of the Temple Lodge has been blest with men, men of character, God-fearing men who had the spirit of Masonry in their hearts, "Slats of the Gate" who loved the Lodge and served it faithfully and well. May the Gate ever continue to be blest with men of this character.

And now we stand on the threshold of another century and look forward with confidence. And it is our earnest prayer that Gate of the Temple Lodge may go forward, a power of strength in the Fraternity, a power for good in the community, and worthy in the eyes of God.

125TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY, MARCH 1980

From Proceedings, Page 1980-46:

History of Gate of the Temple Lodge 1955-1980,
By Brother George W. Collins.

(A detailed history of Gate of the Temple Lodge for the period from 1855 to 1955 may be found in the Proceedings of 1955 on pages 70-87 inclusive).

On March 22, 1955, the Grand Master, Most Worshipful Whitfield W. Johnson, appeared with his official suite of officers and addressed the Lodge. Right Worshipful Frank L. Cushing read his prepared remarks concerning the previous 100 years and Right Worshipful Brother Dresser, the District Deputy Grand Master, gave the closing statements. The Grand Master closed the special meeting of the Grand Lodge and that of the Gate's 100th in Ample Form at 10:30 o'clock.

June 21. The District Deputy Grand Master, Ralph Durning, visited the Lodge for the purpose of presenting a 60 year certificate to Brother Herbert Green, the reception committee being composed of all the available 50 year members headed up by the Chairman, Worshipful George Cook.

October 29, 1957. Letter received from Grand Lodge thanking the Gate for a contribution to the expense of the new floor in the kitchen of the Masonic Home amounting to $2,500. and for the new freezer of $3,800.

March 24, 1959. The Lodge assumed the responsibilities of Mrs. Mary Johnson at the Masonic Home in Charlton.

May 24, 1960. Right Worshipful Arthur Somerville presented Brother Ellis Harrison with a gallon blood donor pin and the Lodge gave the Deputy a check for $262 as a contribution to the purchase of a washing machine for the Home.

November 28, 1961. At the visitation of Right Worshipful John Reid, the Past Masters' jewels of Worshipful Brothers John Halbritter and Ralph G. Pennington were returned to the Lodge by their widows.

May 28, 1963. It was moved to accept responsibility for Mrs. Maud Heim at the Home.

June 25, 1963. A letter from Miss Priscilla Nye returning her father's Past Master's Jewel.

March 24, 1964. Voted to move Lodge quarters to the Quincy Temple by a vote 55 to 5.

May 26. Voted to change the meeting night from the 4th Tuesday to the 3rd Wednesday, also to petition the Grand Lodge to change the Charter from Norfolk Country to Suffolk County.

November 17, 1965. Right Worshipful Victor Thompson cited Worshipful Brothers Bargavakian, David C. Hall, William Hall and George H. Cutlip for their outstanding Blood Bank Donations.

March 16, 1966. Worshipful Brother Burnham of Wollaston Lodge presented the Gate with his great-great-grandfather's Past Master's Apron. He was Worshipful Benjamin T. Wells, Worshipful Master in 1865-67.

April 20. Right Worshipful Robert H. Stevens of the Roxbury 4th District presented the Lodge with his grandfather's lambskin apron received in 1879.

October 19. Letter read from the daughter of Brother John Barber enclosing a picture of him on his 95th birthday. He was raised March 26, 1895.

October 8, 1967. Our Worshipful Frank R. Porter was cited by Right Worshipful Brother Sibley at his visitation for his donation of a gallon of blood to the Blood Bank.

May 15, 1968. Large delegation present at visitation of Right Worshipful Sibley for a presentation of the Fifty Year Medal to Right Worshipful Frank L. Cushing.

January 15, 1969. Worshipful Arthur J. H. Lucas raised his nephew, Peter T. Lucas, who later was to become Master in 1976.

June 18. Brother Thomas Latham presented the Lodge with a State Flag from Mrs. David Lawson in memory of her husband.

November 19. A letter from the Grand Master thanking the Lodge for the gift of $500 to the Home Infirmary Fund. A social hour and dance with the Rainbow Girls and DeMolay guests followed.

December 17. Brothers C. Hall, E. Cluett, P. Lucas and A. Jackson given Blood Donor Pins.

January 21, 1970. Worshipful Michael P. Sargavakian presented Three-Gallon Blood Donor Pin and again on February 9, was given a Five-Gallon Pin. Worshipful Charles E. Hall was also the recipient of a pin for a Three-Gallon donation from Right Worshipful Milton Bright.

May 15. Worshipful Robert S. Cluett gave particulars of a 75-year Veteran's Medal presentation to Brother John Barber in Bradenton, Florida. He was given a 75-year bar for his 50-year Medal by Worshipful John Reid, and Worshipful Brother Cluett presented a special 70-year medal from the Gate, with a personal letter from Most Worshipful Herbert H. Jaynes, Grand Master.

January 21, 1971. The Secretary made appreciative remarks to Worshipful Brothers Kinsman, Cluett, Charles Hall, David and Wyshak for their assistance in visiting 30 brethren at Christmas. It was also noted that the Gate had given twenty Veteran's Medals in 1970.

February 17. At the Visitation of Right Worshipful Wendall R. Freeman, a third degree team was composed of Past Masters of Syrian ancestry with Worshipful Brother Kurker of Mount Tabor Lodge in the East.

December 15, A petition by the Secretary to the Grand Lodge to change the Annual Meeting Night from September to October. Brother John and Mrs. Koopman were admitted to the Masonic Home in Charlton.

February 16, 1972. Dispensation from Most Worshipful Donald W. Vose, Grand Master, authorizing the vacant post of Treasurer, caused by the untimely death of Worshipful Brother Sargavakian to be filled. Worshipful Armenag David was nominated and subsequently installed. Visit by Right Worshipful Brother Freeman and Kilwinning Club Degree Team with Worshipful Alexander Ritchie of Dorchester Lodge in the East.

February 17. Announcement of the passing of one of the Gate's luminaries in the person of Right Worshipful Frank L. Cushing.

June 2. Brother William Sutherland reported he had visited our Brother John Barber in Florida and had found this 77 year Mason in excellent health at 102 years of age.

October 18. Right Worshipful Brother Freeman, at his visitation talked on the problems of the Home and Hospital. A donation from Mrs. Sargavakian was announced.

February 21, 1973. A letter from Mantee Lodge in Florida advising they had performed the burial service for our Brother John Barber, a 78 year member. A visit was made by Right Worshipful Earl Leake who spoke of three options offered by the Grand Lodge in the First Degree Lecture. It was voted at this meeting to join the Quincy Masonic Hall Association by a vote of 55 to 5.

April 18. Members joined with those of Saint Omer Commandery K.T. in the attendance of Services for Worshipful Merle D. Rider at the Redeemer Church.

October 16, 1974. Worshipful Brother Ellis presented a scroll from the Grand Lodge to the effect the Gate had complied with suggested aid to the Grand Lodge Expansion Fund Program.

May 12, 1975. Brother Peter Lucas nominated as incoming Master. Also the occasion for the raising of Brother Paul Lucas by his father, our Right Worshipful Arthur J. H. Lucas.

June 18. After 32 years as Secretary, Worshipful Heath Ellis gave his farewell address.

September 17. Brother Peter Lucas installed as Master by his uncle, Right Worshipful Arthur J.H. Lucas. Brother Melbourn T. Lucas was present to make a presentation of gifts from the family and friends.

November 17, 1976. The final appearance of Right Worshipful Brother Lucas as District Deputy Grand Master. Various presentations and felicitation were made including a set of golf clubs.

December 15. This meeting was devoted to a testimonial and social evening in deference to the retirement of our Chaplain, Reverend Brother Douglas Batten after 22 years of service.

February 16, 1977. A motion was made to set aside $180 per year for the 150th Anniversary Celebration.

September 21. The installation of Officers under the direction of Worshipful Edward G. Cluett, who installed his Brother Robert as Worshipful Master.

March 15, 1978. Right Worshipful Charles Norton made a fraternal visit. A letter from the daughters of Mrs. Maude Heim, our resident at the Home, thanking the Lodge for the many courtesies and attentions during her twelve years of residency.

June 21. Right Worshipful Brother Norton was with us again this evening and a report of the progress of the Quincy Temple Renovation project was made. Brother James Young was nominated to the Worshipful Master for the ensuing year and on September 20 was elevated to be Worshipful Master by his two uncles, Worshipful George Ritchie and Worshipful Alexander Ritchie of Dorchester Lodge and the Kilwinning Club Degree Team.

October 18. At the official visitation of Right Worshipful Brother Norton, he was presented a laminated plaque depicting the Declaration of Independence superimposed over a picture of Independence Hall.

December 20. The Reverend Brother James Allen of the First Parish Church in Dorchester was the speaker of the evening. He is the long time Chaplain of Union Lodge.

January 17, 1979. Brother Stephen F. McDonough was given a Gallon Blood Donor Pin from the Blood Bank.

March 21. The newly appointed District Deputy Grand Master of the 4th Dorchester District, Right Worshipful James G. Buckley, was present for a fraternal visitation. Right Worshipful Arthur Lucas, P.D.D.G.M. was the speaker of the evening.

April 18. Worshipful Alexander Ritchie, Past Master of Dorchester Lodge, gave an interesting and enlightening address on the subject of Masonry in England, Ireland and Scotland.

June 20. The Lodge was honored by the presence of the Grand Master, Most Worshipful [http://www.masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=GMMelanson Arthur H. Melanson, who spoke of the outstanding patriotism and Masonic devotion of the late Massachusetts Senator, Brother Leverett Saltonstall. As a bonus attraction, the second degree of the Order of DeMolay was exemplified by Mannamooskeagan Chapter. The Grand Master closed the Lodge in Ample Form.

March 9, 1980. At three o'clock in the afternoon, approximately 65 persons consisting of the Worshipful Master, line Officers, Past Masters and friends assembled at The Church of the Redeemer in South Boston for the Annual Lodge Church Service which this year happened to be the 125th. The Reverend Douglas Batten came up from his retirement on Cape Cod and took charge of the service, with Scripture reading by the Worshipful Master and appropriate vocal selections by the Secretary, Worshipful William L. Hall, accompanied by Brother George Collins on the organ. Refreshments and a social hour followed to make this event of special interest. It was announced that the Grand Master would be present on March 19 to honor the 125th Anniversary.

Gate of the Temple Lodge continues to do its share in the cause of projecting the Masonic Image in the community it serves. It is a Lodge founded by business men of substance and presided over by a carefully chosen list of Past Masters as the notice will reveal. It would seem appropriate then that mention be made of the six that were chosen to act as District Deputy Grand Master of the 4th District: Right Worshipful Benjamin Pope, 1862; Right Worshipful Fred C. Garvin, 1901; Right Worshipful Frank Cushing, 1926; Right Worshipful Archibald Dresser, 1937; Right Worshipful John Reid, 1951; and Right Worshipful Arthur Lucas, 1969.

Two of Gate's Masters Worshipful Harry Baker and Raymond Jewell presided over the 4th Lodge of Instruction, and one other, Worshipful George Ellis was honored with the Distinguished Service Medal.

This list of dedicated Masons would not be complete without mentioning the members of our Relief Committee, who spend hours administering to the needs of the less fortunate Brethren and their widows; they are Brother Herman Rupp, a 50-year member; Reverend Douglas Batten, longtime Chaplain; Worshipful Armenag David, present Treasurer, and Worshipful William L. Hall, the Secretary as well as Worshipful Sarkin Sarkisian.

It has been my pleasure to have had a part in this 125th Anniversary and as my 60th year of membership approaches, I am grateful for my attachment to this honorable institution for these many years of pleasant association and continue to hold the "Gate" in highest regard and to wish it well in the future.

OTHER

  • 1865 (Permission to remove to Boston; refused, VII-22)
  • 1870 (Arrangement to permit Rabboni Lodge to be chartered, 1870-68)
  • 1918 (Appeal against Master's ruling; 1918-123)
  • 1941 (Reduction of fees declined, 1941-215)
  • 1949 (Jurisdictional amendment to charter, 1949-143)
  • 1964 (Petition to remove to Quincy granted, 1964-177)
  • 1981 (Petition to remove to Stoughton granted, 1981-105)

EVENTS

CONSTITUTION OF LODGE, MARCH 1856

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. XV, No. 7, May 1856, Page 216:

On the evening of the 31st of March last, Gate of the Temple Lodge, which was chartered by the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts at their last quarterly communication, was duly consecrated, at South Boston. The ceremonies were performed by M. W. Grand Master Winslow Lewis, and the installation service at his request was very handsomely conducted by Dr. A. T. Low, our excellent Deputy G. Master — an officer, who, whatever he undertakes, always does well.

The Grand Lodge on this occasion was organized by nearly all its regular officers, and there was a numerous assemblage of Brethren, as we understand invitations were given to all the Masters and Wardens of the Boston Lodges. The Hall where we met is spacious, neatly fitted up and does credit to our Brethren in that flourishing section of the city. The Address of the Grand Master was concise, admonitory, and just what the times require, when Freemasonry is in the full and apparently, overflowing tide of prosperity ; for great floods, as well as neap tides are sources of anxiety, no less in the Masonic, than in the commercial world. May his excellent and warning advice be followed.

The officers installed were Richard M. Barker, W. M,; Joseph W. Howard, S. W.; Samuel R. Spinney, J. W. ; James T. G. Baxter, Trea.; George H. Bartlett, Sec.

Soon after the Masonic ceremonies were concluded, the Grand Lodge met the Brethren in a spacious apartment, in the same building, where a sumptuous entertainment was spread, at which Br. Barker, Master of Gate of the Temple Lodge, presided in a very courteous and acceptable manner. Many speeches, sentiments, and anecdotes, both witty and historical were elicited, and which were enjoyed by those present without causing, them to transgress on late hours.

GRAND MASTER LEWIS' CHARGE

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. XV, No. 10, August 1856, Page 311:

Since the commencement of the present year — and the year is still now in its infancy — five Lodges have been consecrated to Masonry, and all but one embraced in the 1st District, which numbers twenty-two Lodges, all in a most flourishing condition. Here the "Gate of the Temple" has opened its portals of fair proportions and good design. It has presented itself for inspection and approval, and approval has followed inspection; all has been found duly and truly prepared. The officers worthy, and now qualified for action. The posts all manned, awaiting the approach and entrance of the many who desire to behold the interior excellence of the fabric, and to share its hospitable protection, its benign influences. They throng these gates, stimulated by the odor of a public opinion now enthusiastic and cheering; they rush for entrance in crowds, and the Temple might be easily filled from the base to the apex, if the visitors are not rigidly scrutinized, and a wary selection effected.

How shall this be done? What should be the discriminating ordeal; what the passport of admission? Is it sufficient that the applicant is not dishonest, and that he has not committed any overt act of moral delinquency, and that nought can be urged against him? Surely not. Such a recommendation is too passive altogether. It should not be urged what of evil he has not, but what of good he has done. Is he active in the characteristics of excellence? Does his light so shine towards his fellow-men, that they see, know and feel its cheering power? Is his heart in the right place? Is his hand open as day to melting charity? Are his social affections warm, and do his pulses beat with the impulses of humanity and brotherly love, and, as a man, does he feel for and assist his poor suffering brother? If he is not all this, he lacks that which is needful, and the Gate of a hallowed Temple should be barred to his entrance. Such, occupy space but add no beauty to its interior; they increase its weight but not its solidity.

These are the requirements from the heart, the feelings, the morale of the applicant; but these are not all. Some regard should be paid to the head, to the brain, to the intellect; some also lo the intelligence and mental capacity of the inquirer for light. The Constitutions of England are explicit on this subject. They distinctly require that "He should be a lover of the liberal arts and sciences, and have made some progress in one or either of them." The teachings of Freemasonry are founded on the assumption that the recipients are men of some education, with the means and with the aspirations for more light. A virtuous education is enforced on every neophyte in the first degree. The liberal arts and sciences largely commented on, in the second, and in the third, the 47th Problem of Euclid is especially alluded to as expounding the value of exact science, and the cultivation of the mind. The lectures are full of illustrations, metaphors and allusions, which to the ignorant would be incomprehensible and valueless. With such, words are but mere sounds, not suggestive ideas; unintelligible verbiage, heard by the ears, not absorbed by the understanding. As individuals, how great would be deemed the sacrifice to kill an hour with such a Boeotian? Shall we then in our associated capacity, be contented to introduce to our light, the eye that sees not, the ear that hears not, the mind that conceives not?

There are, moreover, other requirements, which are especially necessary to preserve the harmony which should ever attach to our peaceful, fraternal association. Among these are a courteous, amiable disposition; free from acrimony and causticity; temperance in discussion; caution in the imputation of wrong intentions; in short, never departing from the sphere of the gentleman and the Brother. He who has not his passions in due subjection here, may be a firebrand in your Temple, inflaming and destroying your sacred edifice by the unhallowed torch of uncontrolled and devastating passion. To such a one, a fool is preferable, for there is no general suffering from his stupidity, while the first may point a shaft of poisoned words to wound the whole of your numbers.

Such are some of the requirements from those who come to share in the privileges of Freemasonry. Desecrate not the Temple of your fathers by the admission of the unworthy, or the unavailable. Let each and every one bring something to add to its excellence, and increase its splendor. He who enters here becomes a joint possessor of the best of property, and the premium to be advanced by him should be of proportionate value; and the best of securities should be pledged, the collateral of an untarnished reputation, of a useful, life, of a warm heart, of a gentle and courteous deportment, of a cultivated mind, and of an unwavering truth. Thus funded, it cannot depreciate. With such pillars, the edifice will be well supported, arid the superstructure rise to the highest altitude. Looking through the loop-holes of caution at every one who approaches, welcome the good and the true with open gate, but shut down the bar of distrust to those whose passports are not signed by the best of endorsements. Thus guarded, may yours be that gate by which many may pass to the enjoyment of the blessings vouchsafed to the Sons of Latomia.

6TH ANNIVERSARY, MARCH 1862

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. XXI, No. 5, March 1862, Page 185:

The members of Gate-of-the-Temple Lodge located at South Boston, celebrated the sixth Anniversary of the establishment of their Lodge, on Thursday evening, March 13th ultimo. There were present on the occasion about a hundred ladies and about the same number of Brethren, including the principal officers of the Grand Lodge in their rich and showy regalia. The exercises took place in one of the public halls, "which" (we quote from the South Boston Register), "was elaborately and tastefully decorated by Messrs. Lamprell and Marble. The windows were draped in American flags, from which hung bunting along the sides of the hall, terminating at a shield in front, and adorning the name of Washington, surrounded by the emblematic square and compass of the Order. Over the main entrance to the hall was a shield circled by a wreath of olive leaves, upon which rested a globe; and over all hovered an eagle beneath a canopy of flags. The shield was flanked upon either side with flags and bunting; on the right of the shield were the words Gate-of-the-Temple Lodge, and on the left, Instituted, 5856. The general effect of the decorations was very pleasing, evincing great taste in their arrangement.

The officers of the Grand Lodge, with the officers of the celebrating Lodge, were seated on a raised platform, with the Brethren at the opposite end, and the ladies on the sides of the hall, presenting to the eye of the spectator from the gallery, a beautiful tableaux. The exercises were commenced by the W. Master of the Lodge, Brother Benjamin Pope, who delivered the following neat and appropriate Address :—

Welcome, friends from the north — welcome, Brethren from the east, the west, the south! You of the Grand Lodge, welcome! You, Most Worshipful Grand Master, to whom it Is our delight to render honor and allegiance, welcome! And, above all, ladies, you whom we hold most dear to us, who lend the grace of heaven to our homes, engrafting the joys of Paradise upon our lives, and who have come here to beautify and adorn this occasion, welcome! Welcome all, thrice welcome, while we seek to perpetuate the remembrance of an anniversary honored and hallowed by every Brother in the little fraternity that claims the shelter of the canopy of Gate-of-the-Temple Lodge; hallowed in the blessed memory of those cherished Brothers who have gone from among us to that better land, that house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens; honored at an era in our lives as the dawn of a new light upon those old fundamental truths which have come down to as from the fathers, and which teach Friendship, Morality, and Patriotism. Six years have passed away ; and although the all-devouring scythe of Time has not left as unadmonished, yet an all-wise Providence has watched over and protected us, and blessed us with increase and prosperity.

Though Freemasonry is coextensive with the world, its principles coeval with time, it is of course impossible to trace with any degree of accuracy its origin as an institution. Like the Temple of which it is a type, and of which it has been said that it had more the appearance of being the handiwork of the Supreme Architect of the Universe than that of human hands, it is a structure erected without the aaa of any of those usual appliances invented by human ingenuity to cement other societies together.

"No ponderous axe nor sounding anvil rang;
Like some tall tree the noiseless fabric grew."


It is a tradition which has come down to us from past ages. Its insignia are to be found scattered among those shattered remains of ancient grandeur which it has survived so many centuries. The attentive ear has received the sound from the instructive tongue, and the most valuable secrets are safely lodged in the repository of faithful breasts. Tools and implements of architecture, symbols most expressive, have been selected by the fraternity to imprint upon the memory wise and serious truths, and thus, through a succession of ages, have been transmitted, unimpaired, the moat excellent tenets of our institution.

The uninitiated view Masonry only in its garb of secrecy, through which conjecture itself has as yet failed to penetrate. Seeing woman excluded from its privileges and enjoyments, it is with wonder that they view the predominating influence of the social element carried to such perfection. While it is impossible for a woman to be a Mason, yet at the same time none can be aggrieved, since no instance can be recalled of any desiring to become such. And here it will not be improper to remark that if the social relations of any Mason's family is at all unpleasantly affected through neglect, undue absence from home, dissipation, or other fault, such things are not chargeable upon the fraternity. Freemasonry requires that men should be good husbands, good fathers, good citizens, and he who shows himself to be different, is not only unworthy of the society of the Brethren, but is a disgrace to the Order, and is discountenanced and despised by all good Masons. Freemasonry being founded upon the practice of the social and moral virtues, is pre-eminently a social institution, and it seems peculiarly fitting that this Sixth Anniversary of our little Lodge is which we have spent so many happy hours, should be employed in sharing with our families and friends an evening of rational enjoyment. Bat when there are so many bright and shining lights present to-night to shad, their brilliancy on this festive scene, I dare not presume longer to detain you from the realization of any anticipations of pleasure in which you may have indulged. And I rejoice that it is my high privilege to inaugurate this Anniversary Festival by presenting to you Most Worshipful Brother William D. Coolidge, Esq., Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts.

The M. W. Grand Master, William D. Coolidge, Esq., then came forward and said, substantially, that he was thankful for the privilege) and pleasure of being present. I present my thanks, said the speaker, for the warm welcome which greets me. I thank you farther, my Brothers, for this occasion, because it gives as pride to show to those whom we love that Masonry is not the stern, selfish institution it is thought to be. There is, as the Brother said, a social element in it; and he has touched feelingly upon the relations we bear to those present; and although they are not admitted to our Lodge-rooms, who doubts that they are uppermost in the hearts of the Brethren! All we have is theirs — all we hope for is to be shared with them.

R. W. Past Grand Master Winslow Lewis was next introduced. His remarks were pertinent to the spirit, the vivacity of the occasion, observing that he appeared before his hearers in the unenviable character of the oldest in the gay assemblage, but that, from the inspiring presence of the young and the fair before him, the vigor and vivacity of earlier life were again renewed, that though

"Age was on his temples hung
Still the heart, his heart was young."

The speaker made allusions to the personal benefit he had derived here and in foreign lands from his long association with the Order — to its benign influence on the character of those who rightly follow its precepts. He said, that as from him, the Lodge had received its charter six years since, so since, and for the future, its prosperity would be peculiarly dear, and closed with his warmest wishes for its success.

At the conclusion of the addresses, which were listened to with much satisfaction, the whole company joined in singing the following

ODE,
Written for the occasion by Rev. Bro. J. H. Clinch.
Tune - Old Hundred.

When God would form this spacious Earth,
And call creation into birth,
Six days the mighty work was prest,
The seventh was calm and holy rest.

And thus, our week of years is past,
Brothers, our Sabbath dawns at last;
We hail the rest our labors earn,
And to new toils refreshed we turn.

Not for inaction, bat for rest,
The holy Sabbath hours were bleated; —
For works of love and virtue given,
Labors for peace — for hope — for heaven.

While at "the Temple's Gate" we stand,
Such work our heart and hand demand,
Till to a higher Rest we rise,—
The glorious Temple in the skies.

The more formal and serious part of the ceremonies being thus concluded, dancing, as stated in the programme, was next in order. This was continued for a couple of hours, when the party repaired to the banqueting room, and sat down to one of those recherche and elegant suppers for which the celebrated caterer, Mr. J. B. Smith, is pre-eminently distinguished, and which have placed him at the head of his profession.

"It is seldom," says the Register, "that we see in our Ward such brilliant pictures - of sociability and pleasant intercourse as this party presented. About one hundred couples participated. There were some very elegant toilettes, but we cannot gossip of them here as we would of a Presidential levee."

INSTALLATION, NOVEMBER 1878

From Liberal Freemason, Vol. II, No. 9, December 1878, Page 286:

At the Annual Meeting of Gate of the Temple Lodge, F. and A. M., at Masonic Hall, South Huston, Tuesday evening, November 26th, the following officers were reelected, for the ensuing Masonic year: — W. Bro. Alban S. Green, Wor. Master; Joseph R. Grose, Senior Warden; Samuel M. Bedlington. Junior Warden; William H. Ruddick, Treasurer; Elisha F. Thayer, Secretary; and the following appointed: Wor. Bros. Theodore L. Kelley, Chaplain Walter W. Boyden, Marshal; Charles H. Porter, Senior Deacon; Charles D. Smith, Junior Deacon; James Lockhart, Senior Steward; Franklin J. Hicks, Senior Steward; Chas. H. Kimball, Inside Sentinel; Justus P. Weston, Organist; J. Q. A. Holbrook, Tyler.

The Installation services were performed by Wor. Bro. Theodore L. Kelley, assisted by Wor.'. Bro. Thomas H. Harding, as Marshal, at the conclusion of which Wor. Bro. Green was presented with a Past Master's Diploma, and a committee was appointed to procure him a jewel to be presented at the next communication of the Lodge. That jewel is merited.

26TH ANNIVERSARY, MARCH 1881

From Liberal Freemason, Vol. V, No. 1, April 1881, Page 30:

Gate of the Temple Lodge, F. and A. M. celebrated its Twenty-sixth Anniversary Thursday evening, March 24th, at Masonic Hall, South Boston, by giving a social dancing party to its members and their guests, and entertaining them at a supper. The Committee of Arrangements, consisting of Wor. Bros. Joseph R. Grose and William H. Ruddick and Bros. Chas. H. Porter, William H. Cundy, Henry E. Hosley, Samuel M. Bedlington, James A. Lockhart, John Kinnear, and Frank E. Howe, was active and successful in making the one hundred and forty couples present happy. The Committee had enlisted the services of Carter's Orchestra to furnish the dance music, and the supper served by Bro. William Tufts, was laid in the lodge room and banquet hall, giving ample accommodations for seating all present. The Orders of Dances were very neat and tasty, and exceeding appropriate, the outside being printed in colors. When folded they were perfect imitations of a Master Mason's Apron. The occasion, like all the entertainments which have been given by the order in this section of the city, was marked for its sociability.

GRAND MASTER VISIT, MAY 1881

From Liberal Freemason, Vol. V, No. 3, June 1881, Page 95:

One of the most interesting and successful communications of Gate of the Temple Lodge, F. and A. M., was held at Masonic Hall, South Boston, on Tuesday evening, May 24th. In response to an invitation extended by W. Joseph R. Grose, Master of the Lodge, nearly four hundred members of the fraternity representing all the lodges of the Third District were present.

The principal interest centred in the official visit of M. W. Samuel C. Lawrence, Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts. St. Paul's Lodge, W. Master Samuel P. Willis, met in special communication, and, together with a committee from Gate of the Temple Lodge, served as an escort to the M. W. Grand Master. Upon his suite were R. W. Edwin Wright, Deputy Grand Master; W. Wyzeman Marshall, Acting Senior Grand Warden; W. H. H. Soule, D. D., Grand Master of the Third Masonic District, and suite; W. Chas. T. Gallagher, Acting Grand Marshal, and a large suite composed of Masters and Past Masters, representing all the lodges in the district. M. W. Grand Master Lawrence addressed the gathering at length on subjects of special interest to the fraternity during the session of the lodge.

At its close, by invitation of W. Master Grose, the members and their guests were entertained at a substantial banquet, and as post prandial exercise speeches were made by the M. W. Grand Master and the Deputy Grand Masler, also by W. Andrew Hall, of Temple Lodge, and W. Brother Soule, D. D. Grand Master. Brother Wyzeman Marshall also favored live company with a recitation, and with.a second one in response to the enthusiastic commendation of his hearers. The Mendelssohn Quartette enlivened the occasion with their songs.

27TH ANNIVERSARY, MARCH 1882

From Liberal Freemason, Vol. VI, No. 1, April 1882, Page 27:

Gate of the Temple Lodge, F. and A. M., celebrated its 27th anniversary, Thursday evening, March 16th, at Masonic Hall, South Boston, by a dancing party, which was participated in by the members of the Lodge, their friends and ladies, to the number of nearly one hundred and fifty couples. The floor was under the direction of Bro. C. H. Porter and an active corps of aids. The large hall used for dancing was very handsomely decorated with bunting and banners; shields, etc., bearing Masonic devices, were tastefully displayed upon the walls. At intermission a supper furnished by Brother William Tufts was served, ample accommodation having been made for all to be seated at the tables. The Committee of Arrangements consisted of W. M. Samuel M. Bedlington, W. Bros. W. H. Ruddick, Joseph R. Grose, and Theo. L. Kelley, and Bros. C. H. Porter, James A. Lockhart, Frank Locke, F. E. Howe, and J. A. Cook.

LODGE VISIT, FEBRUARY 1883

From Liberal Freemason, Vol. VII, No. 1, April 1883, Page 31:

A delegation from Hiram Lodge No. 17, A. F. and A. M. of Jersey City, N. J., was present Tuesday evening, February 27th, at the regular convocation of Gate of the Temple Lodge, of South Boston, and presented to the Lodge an elegantly framed and handsomely engrossed set of resolutions, expressive of the thanks of Hiram Lodge for the care and attention bestowed during his sickness on Bro.". John Underwood of that Lodge, who died in South Bo*ston in October last. The presentation was made by W. Bro. Thos. Leather of Hiram Lodge, and gracefully received by W. Bro. Samuel Bedlington of Gate of the Temple Lodge. The committee from Hiram Lodge consisted of W. Bro. Thos. Leather W. Bro. Archibald White, Bros. Joseph Francis and John Bird.

ANNUAL MEETING, NOVEMBER 1883

From Liberal Freemason, Vol. VII, No. 9, December 1883, Page 287:

Gate of the Temple Lodge held its annual communication, Tuesday evening, November 27th at Masonic Hall, South Boston, at which the following named Brothers were elected as officers for the ensuing year: For W. M., Charles H. Porter; S. W., James A. Lockhart; J. W., Charles H. Kimball; Treasurer, Joseph L. White; Secretary, Ezra G. Robinson, and the following were appointed by the W. M.; For Chaplain, Theodore L. Kelly; Marshall, Frank Locke; S. D., Frank E. Howe; J. D., E. Burritt Palmer; S. S., John Kinnear; J. S., James A. Cook; I. S., Otis A. Ruggles; Tyler, John Q. A. Holbrook; Organist, Justus P. Weston. Bros. Levi S. Hathaway and James A. Lockhart were elected Trustees of the Permanent Fund. W. Bro. Theodore L. Kelly, assisted by W. Bro. Thomas L. Harding, conducted the ceremony of installing the brothers elect and appointed into their respective offices. The W. M., Bro. Samuel L. Bedlington, on retiring from the chair, addressed the officers and members, and in a feeling manner thanked them for the hearty co-operation and support so cordially extended him during his two years as Master of the Lodge. Latter in the evening, W. Bro. Bedlington was presented by the Lodge with a handsome Past Master's apron, which was followed by a gift, a complete surprise to him, from the members of the Lodge, of an elegant plush-covered rocking chair. W. Bro. Joseph R. Grose, made the presentations, and the recipient returned such thanks as his heart prompted and feelings would allow. At the close of the communication the members and their guests were entertained in the banquet hall.

LITERARY FESTIVAL, JUNE 1884

From Liberal Freemason, Vol. VIII, No. 5, August 1884, Page 158:

Gate of the Temple Lodge, F. and A. M., gave a musical and literary entertainment and strawberry festival at Masonic Hall, South Boston, Thursday evening June 26th, to the members of the Lodge and their families and other invited guests for the purpose of bringing them together socially, that their families might become the better acquainted with each other. Upward ot two hundred and fifty ladies, gentlemen, and children enjoyed the pleasure afforded by the entertainment.

Wor. Bro. Charles H. Porter, after the audience were seated, made a pleasant welcome address, and closed by introducing Brother William Harris as Master of Ceremonies. He, in a humorous manner, successively introduced the talent who had generously volunteered their service to the occasion, and certainly contributed a large share of mirth himself. Brothers Frank W. Knowles, Samuel M. King, Joseph L. White and J. L. Ambrose of the Mendelssohn Quartette sang several pieces. Miss Kate Davis sang and gave some fine recitations; Miss Hannah Grace Sterne sang two solos; Mr. Frazer Coulter gave a recitation; Mr. William Carroll sang, also Bro. Harris, and the two together excited the risibilities of their hearers with several humorous songs. Mr. Gus Kamrnerlee and Mr. Samuel M. King 1ikewise sang several solos; Mr. J. P. Weston was the accompanist for the singers.

The audience fully appreciated the success which attended the efforts of the artists to entertain, and were profuse of their applause and encores to each. At the close of these exercises, an adjournment was had to the upper hall, where prates were laid for a]l and strawberries, ices, and other concomitants were plentifully served. The Committee of Arrangements, consisting of Wor. Bros. C. H. Porter, W. H. Ruddick, J. R. Grose, and S. M. Bedlington, and Bros. C. H. Kimball, J. I. White, Frank Locke, H. E. Hosley, William Harris and Seneca Sanford, can feel well assured that the enjoyable entertainment which they confidently predicted, and labored so assiduously to insure, was fully realized by all whose good fortune it was to be present.

SPECIAL MEETING, FEBRUARY 1885

From Liberal Freemason, Vol. VIII, No. 12, March 1885, Page 383:

At the regular Communication of this lodge, February 24th, the second and third degrees were worked in the presence of three hundred and twenty-five brethren. Worshipful Master Charles H. Porter, was highly commended for the very effective manner in which the degrees were conferred. At the close of the work, a bountiful collation was served, the large number of visiting brethren all being provided with seats. This is one of the lodges in which is demonstrated the fact that good work and good cheer are always appreciated.

OFFICIAL VISIT, OCTOBER 1885

From Liberal Freemason, Vol. IX, No. 8, November 1885, Page 252:

At the regular communication of Gate of the Temple Lodge, October 27th. held in Masonic Hall, South Boston, W. Brother Charles H. Porter, the Master, presiding. R. W. Brother John Carr, D. D. Grand Master from the Fourth Masonic District, made an official visit. On his suite were W. Brothers John F. Newton, G. Senior Warden; William G. Fish, G. Junior Warden; Frank Burr, G. Treasurer; H. W. Gore, G. Secretary; S. A. Bolster, G. Marshal and R. W. Brother W. H. H. Soule, P. Junior G. Warden; R. W. Brother Wm. I. Goodrich, P. D. D. G. Master; W Brothers Joel Seaverns and D. W. Jones, of Washington Lodge; W. F. Mullen, of Lafayette Lodge; W. J. Hargraves, of Eliot Lodge; E. H. Brainard, H. W. Wilson, Charles J. Noyes and George H. Colby, of Adelphi Lodge; A. H. White of Rabboni Lodge; S. V. Willis, of St. Paul Lodge; Samuel Hosea, Jr., of Aberdour Lodge; J. Waldo Denny, of Joseph Webb Lodge; J. H. Bouve, of Konohassett Lodge ; G. M. Bowditch, of King Solomon's Lodge; Austin Bigelow, of Bethesda Lodge; and Brothers C. E. Pierce, of Rural Lodge, and A. E. Carr, and E. B. Newton, of Washington Lodge. After the official inspection by the District Deputy Grand Master, W. Brother Porter, and the officers, assisted by the members, presented an exemplification of the work, which was specially commended in an address by R. W. Brother Carr.

The engrossed memorial, which had been received from Hiram Lodge, of Fredericton, N. B. was placed in the custody of the Lodge, encased in a handsome frame, by W. Brother Wm. H. Ruddick, in well-chosen words, and was accepted in the name of Gate of the Temple Lodge, by its W. Master.

At the close of the communication, the members and their guests enjoyed a social season, to the gratification of the inner man, and an intellectual treat through speeches from the lips of W. Brothers Newton, Brainard, Bolster, Denny, Wilson, Burr and Noyes, of the District Deputy's suite.

OFFICIAL VISIT, OCTOBER 1886

From Liberal Freemason, Vol. X, No. 8, November 1886, Page 252:

Gate of the Temple Lodge, F. and A. M., of South Boston, Wor. Bro. Charles H. Porter, Master, was officially visited Tuesday evening, October 26th, by Rt. Wor. Bro. John Carr, D. D. Grand Master for the Fourth Masonic District. He was accompanied by Wor. Bro. S. A. Bolster, D. D. Grand Marshal, and by a large suite of Past and Presiding Masters. There were also on his suite Bro. G. Gordon Boyne of Hibernia Lodge, and Bros. G, H. Trueman and J. A. Fish of Albion Lodge, St. John, N. B.

The communication was very largely attended, and was full of interest to the brethren. At the close of the duties connected with the visit of the official representatives of the Grand Lodge, Wor. Master Porter introduced Bro. G. Gordon Boyne, of Hibernia Lodge, of St. John, N. B., who, in well-selected remarks, presented to Wor. Bro. Joseph R, Grose, a Past Master of Gate of the Temple Lodge, a handsomely engraved and elegantly framed certificate of honorary membership in Hibernia Lodge, as a testimonial of the esteem in which Wor. Bro. Grose is held by the members of that lodge, and in recognition of the care and kindness extended to a member of Hibernia Lodge during his dying hours in this city, as well as in forwarding the remains to St. John for interment, a service in which Wor.-. Bro. Grose was a leading spirit. In acceptance of the certificate the recipient made an earnest and feeling speech. At the close of the lodge, the members and their guests repaired to the banqueting hall, where refreshments were served, and where they were entertained by speeches "from Wor. Bro. S. A. Bolster, Theo. L. Kelly, Charles J. Noyes and others, and by several recitations by Bro. Louis Aldrich, all of which were greatly appreciated and loudly applauded.

53RD ANNIVERSARY, MARCH 1908

New England Craftsman, Vol. III, No. 9, June 1908, Page 359:

The fifty-third anniversary of the organization of Gate of the Temple Lodge, So. Boston, was celebrated Tuesday evening, March 19, in a most enjoyable manner. The opening feature was a banquet which was graced by the presence of the ladies of the members. The banquet was followed by a musical and literary entertainment, and this by dancing which was continued until 12 o'clock. There were about three hundred present. Among the guests were: Right Worshipful Fred E. Garvin, District Deputy Grand Master of the Fourth District; Worshipful Sherburne N. Miller, master of Lafayette Lodge; Worshipful Edwin H. Oliver, master of Washington Lodge and Most Excellent William T. Rule, high priest of St. Matthews R. A. Chapter. The committee of arrangements consisted of John Halbritter, Worshipful Master, Olaf Olsen. Senior Warden; Frank H. Sweetland and other officers of the lodge. A large reception committee, of past masters of the lodge looked after the comfort of the members and guests.

SPECIAL MEETING, JANUARY 1916

From New England Craftsman, Vol. XI, No. 5, February 1916, Page 169:

The regular communication of Gate of the Temple Lodge, A. F. & A. M., South Boston, was signalized by the presence as guests of all the Masonic ministers in South Boston. The business of the evening commenced at 5.30 o'clock when the first section of the M. M. degree was worked on three candidates. At 6.30 the guests and a large number of the members of the lodge sat down to a good dinner, which was made doubly enjoyable by lively music. The postprandial speakers, who were felicitously introduced by W. M. Harry H. Ham, included the following ministers: Rev. Lucius R. Paige, pastor of the Church of Our Father; Rev. James Sheerin, rector of St. Matthew's Episcopal Church; Rev. Clarence W. Dunham, pastor of Phillips Congregational Church; Rev. Albert Crabtree, Protestant Chaplain of the Massachusetts State Prison; Rev. William J. Rutledge, Pastor of South Boston Baptist Church; Rev. C. H. McCurdy, Pastor of Grace Episcopal Church; and Rev. Haig Adadourian, of Boston.

Rev. James Huxtable, chaplain, officiated at the altar. At 8 o'clock the brethren were called from refreshment to labor again. The evening's business consisted of the reports of the various committees and of balloting on candidates. The second part of the M. M. work was then taken up. W. M. Harry H. Ham's lecture as well as the work of all the participants was of a high order, characterized by dignity and beauty.


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