RobertLash

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ROBERT LASH LODGE

MA_RobertLash.jpg

Location: Chelsea

Chartered By: Charles C. Dame

Charter Date: 12/11/1867 VII-193

Precedence Date: 01/10/1867

Current Status: in Grand Lodge Vault; surrendered 08/19/1993.

According to the Grand Master's Address, Page 1993-129: "Two Lodges during the past year have found it impossible to continue either by merging or by operating as a daylight Lodge." (The other lodge was Morning Sun of Conway.)


PAST MASTERS

  • Eben W. Lothrop, 1867
  • James S. Dillingham, 1868-1870
  • John Edmunds, 1871-1873
  • John H. Roberts, 1874, 1875
  • Franklin O. Barnes, 1876, 1877
  • Benjamin F. Dodge, 1878, 1879
  • Robert F. Means, 1880, 1881; SN
  • John H. Cunningham, 1882, 1883
  • Albert B. Richardson, 1884, 1885
  • Thomas L. Bond, 1886, 1887
  • Daniel G. Crandon, 1888, 1889; Mem
  • Elmer Lewis French, 1890, 1891
  • Woodbury T. Jordan, 1892, 1893
  • Arthur B. Champlin, 1894
  • Ralph W. E. Hopper, 1895, 1896
  • William B. Walker, 1897, 1898
  • William H.L. Odell, 1899, 1900
  • Thomas Coyle, 1901, 1902
  • Frank Weymouth, 1903, 1904
  • George A. Brown, 1905
  • George A. Patten, 1906
  • Walter S. Litchfield, 1907, 1908
  • George A. Clough, 1909, 1910
  • Milber A. Dykeman, 1911, 1912
  • William B. Denison, 1913, 1914
  • James S. Harrower, 1915, 1916; SN
  • Clarence Alvin Warren, 1917, 1918
  • Alton B. Atwood, 1919, 1920
  • James T. Stormont, 1921, 1922
  • Paul D. Harrower, 1923, 1924
  • Roert O. Rockwell, Jr., 1925, 1926
  • Charles W. Shannon, 1927, 1928
  • George W. Scott, 1929, 1930
  • Edward W. East, 1931, 1932; SN
  • William H. Crafts, 1933, 1934; SN
  • Samuel A. S. Strahan, 1935, 1936
  • Harry J. B. Simmons, 1937, 1938
  • Clifton D. Rockwell, 1939, 1940
  • Harry C. Winton, 1941, 1942
  • Wendell W. Dykeman, 1943, 1944
  • John Neil, 1945, 1946
  • Herbert L. Sheppard, 1947, 1948
  • Harold E. Williams, 1949, 1950
  • Wilfred Peach, 1951, 1952
  • Frederick W. Harvey, 1953, 1954
  • Edwin W. Maddocks, 1955, 1956; SN
  • Robert P. Renfrew, 1957, 1958
  • Donald J. Malchajian, 1959, 1960
  • Simeon J. Kelloway, 1961, 1962
  • Norman W. King, 1963, 1964
  • Albert J. Mills, 1965, 1966
  • John C. Noftle, 1967, 1968
  • Albert C. Gillespie, 1969
  • Colon O. Ward, Jr., 1970, 1971
  • Walter C. Ultsch, 1972, 1973
  • Norris W. Stone, 1974
  • Frank J. Camillieri, 1975, 1976
  • William H. Truehart, Jr., 1977
  • Clarence F. Penney, 1978, 1979
  • Sebastian S. Viola, 1980
  • James R. Goodwin, 1981-1983
  • Joseph W. Manning, 1984, 1985
  • Richard E. Lemerise, 1986, 1987
  • Albert J. Terminello, 1988, 1989, 1993
  • Gene Whitney P. Winam, 1990-1992

REFERENCES IN GRAND LODGE PROCEEDINGS

  • Petition for Dispensation: 1867
  • Petition for Charter: 1867
  • Surrender of Charter: 1993

ANNIVERSARIES

  • 1918 (50th Anniversary)
  • 1943 (75th Anniversary)
  • 1967 (Centenary)

VISITS BY GRAND MASTER

BY-LAW CHANGES

1880 1886 1890 1892 1896 1899 1923 1924 1925 1927 1928 1949 1950 1959 1963 1968 1970 1989

HISTORY

  • 1943 (75th Anniversary History, 1943-47; see below)
  • 1967 (Centenary History, 1967-572; see below)

75TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY, APRIL 1943

From Proceedings, Page 1943-47:

By Wor. Ralph Waldo Emerson Hopper.

Under ordinary conditions in the compiling of the history of a Lodge which has completed seventy-five years of Masonic work, the record of its life as an entirety ought to be given without special emphasis in favor of its earliest years. When, however, the task is undertaken solely as part of an anniversary ceremonial, the mind instinctively bridges the years and concerns itself principally with beginnings, in an effort to visualize and present to view conditions somewhat as they were on the day whose seventy-fifth recurrence we have gathered to observe. In the course of the years which have passed since our Lodge was organized, all of its founders have passed away. To most of us, unborn when our Lodge was constituted, such facts as may here be set down as to the Brothers who formed it, the causes which let to its birth and the ceremonies which officially established it might almost come under the head of ancient history. It should be our effort, therefore, not alone because of today's celebration, but for the benefit of our younger members and those who are to come after us, to search the past diligently, and gather from record and tradition some knowledge of our founders, why they thought it wise to form a second Lodge in our City, and then to learn and place upon record as much as may appropriately be stated of the personality and career of the illustrious Brother whose name we bear. Then, when this is done as fully as the properties of the occasion will permit, we may briefly sketch something of our real history, embodying quotations from our records, statistics of our growth and progress and more or less comparison of our development with that of the community where for seventy-five years we have received our support and played our part.

Our parent Lodge, of course, was Star of Bethlehem, organized twenty-five years before our time and now about to observe its one hundredth anniversary. Among its Past Masters were two Brothers especially active and prominent who had worked untiringly together to build better recognition of the merit and principles of our Fraternity as an asset to our community. These two were John Low and Eben W. Lothrop, ardent lovers of Masonry, highly respected by their fellow citizens. It is upon the authority of Right Worshipful Tracy P. Cheever, who was in every way qualified to speak positively upon the subject, that the statement is here made that these two Brethren were the backbone of the Fraternity at the period preceding our advent upon the scene.

Their efforts were crowned with success. As Worshipful Masters of our parent Lodge they both served it well, gathering about them many Brethren of character and influence, and were foremost in its affairs after their terms of office were over. Such men would not have deserted it for mere pique, or to win personal glory, or with any intent to injure the fabric which was so largely the work of their own hands. That they did so, is reason sufficient for us to feel that a second Lodge was needed to give new impetus and vitality to the work of the Masonic Order in this city, then a place of about 15,000 people. We may be sure that there is no taint upon our birth, and that our elders embarked upon the new enterprise only for the welfare of the Fraternity and the good of the Order. From out the pages of an almost unknown record there are taken these words, following a list of the twenty-nine founders whose names appear on the evening program.

These brethren, all but two of whom were members of Star of Bethlehem Lodge, were moved to the establishment of a new Lodge mainly by the consideration that the Mother Lodge was already large (having more than 200 members) and that the social element so important to the true appreciation and enjoyment of our institution could not well exist in so numerous a body. The old members who had borne the burden and heat of the day in Star of Bethlehem Lodge scarcely knew the faces of new members, and still less their names; and it was considered that inasmuch as the increase of population of the city and the rapid growth of the Fraternity everywhere would inevitably create an early demand for another Lodge, it would be wise that some of the oldest and most practical members of Star of Bethlehem Lodge should unite at this time in the formation of a new one.

These members had been closely bound not only by Masonic ties, but by cords of personal esteem and friendship. Many of them had worked together in other departments of Masonry and had learned that the circle of true Masonic friendship to be perfect must be small. They therefore sought to form a Lodge in which, while a proper attention to the ritual and the practical duties of Masonry should be observed, all the amenities and all the social benefits which lie, as it were, hidden in the capacious bosom of our noble mother should be extracted and enjoyed. Having in their wisdom agreed upon the necessity for the new Lodge, their first care was to give it a name worthy of the high level upon which they wished it to stand.

Some three years before the first steps were taken to form our Lodge, there had been laid to rest in Chelsea a most distinguished Brother. The public Masonic ceremonies attending this sad event were so dignified, the gathering so notable and the eulogies so striking that his character and attainments had become deeply impressed upon the memories of our citizens,particularly those of Masonic affiliation. The illustrious Brother whose obsequies had been so imposing a spectacle bore the name of Robert Lash.

Born in Boston November 7, 1779, he attended school there and was one of the first group of boys to receive that coveted meed of scholarship known as the Franklin Medal. For fifty years he was associated with the old Boston Bank and was an official there until his death in October 1863, having then reached the age of eighty-three years, eleven months. During his most active years he resided in various parts of the old North End, but in 1843 he purchased a house at the corner of Chestnut and Fourth Streets in Chelsea, which he later made his home, spending the evening of his life among us here, enjoying the love and respect of all who knew him. The purity of his personal character showed in his face, although its gentle benignity gave no hint of the remarkable fearlessness and moral courage which a study of his career proves him to have possessed. It is of course with his Masonic life and record that we are chiefly concerned. He was raised in Mount Lebanon Lodge in Boston in 1801 at the age of twenty-two years, and after serving it as Secretary and in other capacities, became its Worshipful Master in 1812, serving again in the East in 1822. For fifteen years, beginning with 1818, he held office in the Grand Chapter of Massachusetts, reaching the chair of Deputy Grand High Priest. In 1824 he was elected Commander of Boston Encampment, K.T., and in 1832 became Grand Master of the Grand Encampment of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. In 1844 he was Senior Grand Warden of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, being then sixty-five years of age.

We of today have but a faint idea of the physical and moral stamina required of one who would hold high office in the Masonic Fraternity at the period in which he was most active. Doubtless the times, which we may well call the dark and anxious days of Masonry, did much to make him conspicuous and to increase his influence, for then as now, "the occasion ever makes the man." As we in these days see our Fraternity respected, it is hard to conceive the gloomy period when for a man to acknowledge the tie of Masonry was to invite suspicion, abuse, persecution and threats; and it is only because our beloved Brother endured these things with steadfast purpose and unfaltering courage that reference is here made to the subject even superficially. But it was not his inflexible firmness and resolution, great as these were, which at that time distinguished him amongst his Brethren of equal fortitude. His greatness lay in the purity of his moral character; and the influence which he exercised to calm the spirit of hatred and passion which was aroused against our Order came not from his lofty Masonic office and high position, but from the daily exemplification in his own life of the principles for which this great Fraternity of ours then stood and will ever stand until Time shall be no more. Every account of him which has been studied lays stress upon this; and while we today honor the sublime courage and spirit which led him to sign the historic "Declaration of the Freemasons of Boston and Vicinity," (a draft of which from his own pen was kept in this Lodge until lost in our great fire) his Brethren of the time, under the direct influence of his living personality, realized his true worth better than we can ever hope to do. He is our patron saint, almost, and we are entitled to one more glimpse of him as he appeared to those who stood by his side. It was said of him by a widely known contemporary, "His simple presence in our midst was enough to draw back many thoughtful and considerate men from the ranks of the opposition who would otherwise have been impelled thereto by the excitement which raged around them;" and it came to be an accepted fact "that an institution to which the upright and spotless Robert Lash belonged could be neither corrupt nor dangerous to the interests of mankind."

It is nearly seventy years since any historical account of our proceedings has been published and therefore only our earliest activities have so far been summarized. Far more time was needed to delve into our records than could be allotted to the task, but it is hoped that something of interest and perhaps of real value may come to us from such study as has been possible and from what is hereafter set down. The first written record, that of the founders' meeting, shows that it was held in Fraternity Hall, at the corner of Broadway and Everett Avenue, December 6, 1866.

There were twenty-nine Master Masons present, conspicuous among whom were six Past Masters of Star of Bethlehem Lodge: Worshipful Brothers John Low, Eben W. Lothrop, John F. Fellows, Tracy P. Cheever, William A. Williams and Charles F. Haynes. Worshipful Brother Lothrop presided and Brother George W. Churchill kept the record from which these facts were taken: They met, as their Secretary states, "agreeably to previous arrangement," and the Chairman announced that the object of the meeting was "to deliberate on the condition of the Order in this place and to consider its needs." They prepared a petition to the M.W. Grand Master asking for a Dispensation authorizing them to meet as a regular Lodge and to confer degrees, suggesting the appointment of the following officers:

  • Eben W. Lothrop, Worshipful Master
  • James S. Dillingham, Jr., Senior Warden
  • Hadley P. Burrill, Junior Warden
  • Slade Luther, Treasurer
  • Horace P. Eldridge, Secretary

The signers of the petition, in addition to the six Past Masters of Star of Bethlehem Lodge already named, were all members of that body excepting two. They were Brothers John Edmunds, Josiah A. Osgood, James M. Greenwood, William Reed, George W. Churchill, Benjamin P. Shillaber, James S. Dillingham, Jr., James E. Barrell, Sumner Carruth, Hadley P. Burrill, Davis W. Bailey, Alexander Campbell, Alpheus J. Hilbourn, Samuel Batchelder, Thomas H. Carruth, Frederick Spoor, Samuel Orcutt, Rufus S. Owen, Slade Luther, Horace P. Eldridge, Joseph Brooks, Michael Watson and Joseph P. Flint. Worshipful Brothers Dillingham and Edmunds were the only two of these who ever became members of Robert Lash Lodge after its charter was granted. None of the twenty-nine still survive, and so far as I can learn, not a single lineal descendant of any of them is in our membership today.

To Worshipful Brother Lothrop was assigned the somewhat delicate task of obtaining the necessary consent from Star of Bethlehem Lodge, and to Brother B. P. Shillaber fell the privilege of suggesting the name of the proposed body, which he did by moving that it "be named after the late venerable and esteemed man and Mason, Past Master and Most Eminent Sir Robert Lash." It was also voted to raise the funds necessary to obtain the dispensation by loan; "whereupon," says the Secretary, "Bros. Carruth and Lothrop at once offered to furnish the same!" It was then Voted that in no case was the membership to exceed one hundred, and the meeting adjourned after expressing its "determination to promote harmony and good fellowship with all true Lodges and Masons throughout the jurisdiction and especially with the Parent Lodge from which we sprung."

January 21, 1867, the new Lodge met in Masonic Hall; the Most Worshipful Grand Master's Dispensation was read and the Lodge opened in due form with eleven officers and fourteen members present, the versatile and willing Worshipful Brother Cheever accepting the post of Organist. At this meeting the daughters of Robert Lash presented to the new Lodge his jewels and insignia of office, and a distinguished Brother brought to us the old trestle board which Brother Lash had used many years before in Mount Lebanon Lodge.

The first applicant for the degrees was George Willcomb, who remained a member until his death in 1913.

The fourth Wednesday of the month, our present meeting night, was then chosen for regular communications, and the Brethren adopted a by-law whereby membership should be granted only by ballot, after proposal, investigation and report, and only at a quarterly communication. This was long since repealed and membership follows the ceremony of the third degree automatically.

On December 13, 1867, at the annual meeting of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, our charter was granted, and on December 23, 1867, Robert Lash Lodge was formally constituted by Most Worshipful Charles C. Dame, Grand Master, assisted by all his officers, in the presence of many distinguished guests, among whom were Past Grand Masters Winslow Lewis and William Parkman and the two oldest members of Star of Bethlehem Lodge, Rev. Brother Charles H. Leonard and Brother William S. Merriam, whose grandson, Otis, later made a most remarkable record as our Secretary.

We are told that "the proceedings were in conformity with ancient custom and with the accompaniment of solemn music by a select choir." The ceremony of constitution being finished, the Most Worshipful Grand Master installed as first officers under the charter:

  • James S. Dillingham, Jr., Worshipful Master
  • John Edmunds, Senior Warden
  • Isaac S. Dillingham, Junior Warden
  • George W. Churchill, Treasurer
  • Rufus S. Owen, Secretary
  • William Shillaber, Senior Deacon
  • John H. Roberts, Junior Deacon
  • Wor. John Low, Senior Steward
  • Wor. John F. Fellows, Junior Steward
  • Sumner Carruth, Marshal
  • Thomas H. Carruth, Inner Sentinel
  • Wor. Tracy P. Cheever, Outer Sentinel
  • Amos Seavey, Tyler

The evening's duties having been thus far happily performed, the Brethren gathered "under the ridgepole" where all labors ceased, save for Stewards and our worthy Secretary, who takes pains to tell us what happened in these words:

"A sumptuous banquet prepared according to the ideas of our ancient brethren but with the modern improvements by Bro. Frederick Spoor was spread upon the tables which could scarcely sustain the weight of the viands. After the cloth was removed, which was done in figure only, W. P. M. Tracy P. Cheever who presided at the feast, called the attention of the company to the circumstances under which they had met, giving a brief history of the formation of the new Lodge and a short analysis of the character of the eminent and sainted brother who had been chosen to give a name to the institution."

The distinguished guests all spoke and received due mention by the observant Secretary. Especially does he set down the remarks of Right Worshipful Brother Moore, Grand Secretary, "who," he says, "referred in a striking and earnest manner to the days of Anti-Masonry in which Robert Lash proved himself so faithful and true to our Fraternity and its principles." He adds, "At 11 o'clock, the brethren having assembled at 6:30, the Chairman closed the feast with a sentiment in honor of the Parent Lodge and thus were happily consummated the ceremonies attending the constitution of Robert Lash Lodge."

Inconspicuously placed in our records among the notes of ordinary Lodge routine, we find incidental reference to many entertaining matters. Time will not allow their mention to any great degree, but it is most interesting to see how frequent were the Most Worshipful Grand Master's warnings against impostors, against the use of books and various other things, and to watch the gradual adoption into our own every-day common usage of the disciplinary suggestions often made for the good of the Order. Certain passages from our early records show us that the Prohibition movement had its champion in our Lodge in the person of one Worshipful Brother who endeavored strenuously to prevent all use of intoxicants in and about the premises under our control, and who once called our attention to the use of part of the Grand Lodge building by a "Larger Beer Saloon" and requested its removal forthwith. His unfamiliarity with the strong waters of which he so greatly disapproved, led him to spell it "Larger," which perhaps was a more potent drink than the malt beverages of today. The incident, if it has any importance, merely shows us that assemblies of Masons, like gatherings of other men seventy-five years ago, reflected the customs of the period, which were a bit more convivial than those of today. It has so long been our experience that happy upstairs companionship can exist wholly free from the stimulating influences to which our good Brother objected, that we may well feel that in this direction at least our Brotherhood is practicing more and more the principles to which it is bound.

It was the recommendation of one Worshipful Master that the Brethren of Robert Lash Lodge appear at their meetings wearing white gloves in addition to the usual Masonic clothing, but it is nowhere stated that such ever became our practice. Among other curious items of interest, it appears that Worshipful Brother Lothrop, on behalf of the Lodge, set out a tree in our Union Park dedicated to the memory of Robert Lash and that it was designated as Tree No. 7 on a sketch made by Brother Eben W. Lothrop, Jr.

We may also read that upon one occasion three of our Past Masters were simultaneously presented with their jewels. The record shows no reason for the delay in giving these worthy Brethren the decoration which custom had made their proper due, but it may be found here that for quite a few years the annual reports, while scrupulously setting forth the payment of all bills, also showed a "balance due the Treasurer!" At another time, at an annual meeting we took four ballots to elect a Worshipful Master before either of the two candidates would accept the office. The Secretary that night was too busy noting the returns of the balloting to inform us through his records what all this was about, but the difficulty, as the present scribe sees it, was that one of the candidates, although duly chosen, was not willing to accept election by a bare majority or to be the cause of ill feeling which might injure the future harmony of his Lodge. One was finally persuaded. The other was chosen the next year, but with such opposition that he again declined. An election under dispensation followed, the successful candidate receiving the full vote of his Brethren, and upon his installation, the memorandum was made that "the countenances of several of our elder brethren beamed upon us that had not done so for some time." It appears then, that even in their differences our Brethren had the interests of their Lodge first at heart, and for that reason alone the incident is narrated here.

We find references to appropriate action at the time of a great yellow fever scourge in the South in our early years, at the time of the great conflagration in Chicago, and a pathetic and most dignified allusion to our own losses in the great Boston Fire of 1872 and to our duties towards our Brethren whose misfortunes there were greater than our own.

For several years it was the custom to record in full the remarks of the Worshipful Master at the annual meeting, and to note in his own words his thanks, his criticisms and his recommendations. This practice has long since been abandoned, and perhaps wisely so, but it is one of the penalties of progress that we are bound to lose the fine old flavor of former times somewhat, and so the keeping of our records has become brief and businesslike and probably better, but far less interesting to the reader and less valuable to the historian. It cannot be reasonably expected otherwise, for there have been many changes since the raising of five or six candidates was considered a good year's work.

We have had public installations of much interest; one in particular is recorded where Right Worshipful Brother Wyzeman Marshall, an actor of the old school, officiated with great success. At another of these functions we had as our special guest Miss Rebecca Lash, a daughter of Robert Lash, a sprightly little lady of eighty-five years, destined to see her ninety-ninth birthday before her death.

The night when the Master Mason Degree was exemplified, with the officers in costumes appropriate to the ancient Brethren whom they represent in the work and the singers garbed as monks, must have been worth a visit; also the night when four brothers of the Robinson family received their third degree together, the fifth already being a member. Again an unusual event occurred when Worshipful Master Stormont raised his two sons the same night.

Our country's entry into World War I led to the formation of the Masonic Temple Home Guard Unit, our example being quickly followed by all the other fraternal organizations in town. The high point was reached when in response to a request by the Public Safety Committee, nearly four thousand men took part in a Preparedness Parade, which was undoubtedly good psychology in view of the excited state of the public mind. From time to time our members have participated in public occasions, corner-stone layings, church services and the like.

These things all seem worthy of mention, as are references to our early financial struggles, and the success of our great Fair in 1875, which, aided by generous contributions from the Brethren, furnished our then new Temple and established our Permanent Fund.

Countless little items of more than passing interest are noted in our records, but it must be borne in mind that we are only trying to get a little insight into our Lodge history, not the complete story of its life.

For the first seven years of our existence we met in the Masonic Hall at the corner of Broadway and Everett Avenue, owned by Worshipful John Low. Our occupation was apparently not a source of steady income to him, but this was partly his own fault for it is recorded that he once told his Brethren "they might pay their rent when due, if not then when they could, or if need be, not at all."

It is pleasing to learn from our records that "Robert Lash Lodge as its last official act prior to its departure from its chosen Masonic resting place desires to place upon record the expression of its warmest thanks and gratitude to W. Bro. John Low, the landlord of this Masonic Hall, for the distinguished consideration, courtesy and generosity manifested by him to the Fraternity from the commencement of its occupation until the present hour, with full assurance that his kindness to all his brethren can never pass from memory."

Our removal was to the Masonic Temple in Campbell's Block, at the corner of Broadway and Third Street, its dedication on March 31, 1874, being probably the most elaborate Masonic event which Chelsea ever saw. The Most Worshipful Grand Master was present and officiated, a throng of distinguished Brethren gathered to participate, and to crown all, our Brother Tracy P. Cheever prepared and delivered in his faultless manner a history of the five Masonic bodies of the City which was printed and which for many years was the last resort in the settlement of local discussions as to the facts affecting the Fraternity.

Here was the Masonic birthplace of many of us, for it was our abode until 1908, when our great fire left us homeless and dependent upon the hospitality of our neighbors for a dwelling place. Our East Boston Brethren permitted us to use their Temple and there we met until in 1910 this place was made ready for us.

Right Worshipful Brother Cheever, in his history read at the dedication of the Temple already mentioned, makes allusion to the "Banquet Records" of our Lodge. These we find to be extant, but never kept up as he had intended. What he meant to accomplish is best stated in his own words: "This book, entitled 'Banquet Records of Robert Lash Lodge,' is intended to contain such writings of the members of the Lodge as have been and shall be prepared for the instruction and entertainment of our social meetings, at which the intercourse of the brethren, under proper guidance, shall be free and unrestrained; when hearts shall be opened and souls shall intermingle in the true spirit of fraternity." The record as far as written under his direction, gives a biographical sketch of each of the charter members and of those who were first added to their number. These sketches, while full of real information, are frankly-humorous, filled with sly hits at the personal traits of the various Brethren, and could be appreciated only by their intimate acquaintance. They make interesting reading, but cannot be used for our present enjoyment.

At the quarterly communications for the first few years, the rule was against degree work. The necessary business was done, the election of Brethren to membership was held, and the rest of the evening spent in the banquet hall, where distinguished guests were always in waiting and where speeches, poems and original songs were delivered with great success, to the huge enjoyment of all present. In the hands of such men of pronounced literary skill as Brothers Cheever and Shillaber, we may be sure that these evenings were never dull. As years rolled on, we met the inevitable changes which time ever brings to personnel. These earlv Brethren were gathered to their fathers, and the great men who were on our Honorary list passed away, never without exhaustive tributes to their worth and careful accounts of their lives and service to Masonry being spread upon our records. Truthful and instructive in form, dignified and rich in style, these had a loftiness of thought and painstaking accuracy which must have deeply impressed all who heard them read. Among these memorial pages there lies ready to hand a mass of early local Masonic history of great value. Let me cite an example. In 1878, in the midst of a terrific storm of snow, a joint meeting of Star of Bethlehem and Robert Lash Lodges was held in memory of Worshipful Brother Lothrop. As he had presided over both of them, both Lodges opened in form, one after the other.

Poetry, music and eulogy, all the work of our Lodge Brethren, marked the occasion, which was further graced by the presence of the Most Worshipful Grand Master and a distinguished suite of Brethren high in the councils of the Craft.

It has been impossible to avoid frequent reference to these elder Brethren — Low, Lothrop, Cheever, Shillaber — these were our greatest names, and that we have an early history worth recording, is due to them. As time removed them one by one, there was genuine sorrow felt and expressed, and no higher tribute can well be conceived than that paid to the memory of Brother Cheever in 1881 by the Grand Lodge, of which he was then Grand Secretary — "My record is finished." Our own memorial to him reads, "Robert Lash Lodge recognizes in its deceased brother the organic power of its existence, the framer of its laws, the inspirer of its hopes, the guide of its early fortunes and the inspirer of its social life."

Worshipful Brother Cheever, as has been stated, wrote the only history of our Lodge which can be found. He concluded his work in this wise: "What Robert Lash Lodge shall hereafter accomplish for the Fraternity in this Commonwealth of which it is a constituent, time alone will disclose. Bearing one of the most exalted names in the Masonic calendar and favored by the honorary connection of some of the noblest brethren of the present generation, an unusual weight of responsibility rests upon its active members." How far we have realized the high hopes of that day is perhaps even for those who come after us to discern, but the record is written and must stand or fall without alteration. Briefly, it is this: Robert Lash Lodge has held in all 762 regular communications; more than 1000 Brethren have signed its membership roll, 338 of whom are still holding their memberships. It has had forty Worshipful Masters, of whom fifteen are still living, their names and periods of service being shown upon the evening's program. Five of the six first named wore the Union Blue in the days of '61.

Twice have the sons of Past Masters been called to the Oriental Chair to succeed them — Worshipful Brothers Dykeman and Harrower having thus been followed; also the East has been occupied by the two brothers Rockwell.

These Worshipful Brethren have come from every walk of life—a fine testimony to the democracy and breadth of thought of our Fraternity. All have been men respected in the community and none has ever been chosen because of his worldly wealth or social standing or been denied the honor because of his humble calling. One and all they have met the duties of the hour and have presided over us with ability and dignity.

Five times we have been honored by the Grand Master in the appointment of District Deputies—Worshipful Brothers Means, Crandon, Odell, Harrower and Crafts all having served with distinction. Seven of our members have received Veteran's Medals, presented by the Grand Lodge, and one has received the Joseph Warren Medal.

With the exception of three, I have personally known all of our Past Masters, some of them well, others intimately, and nothing would please me more than from my own knowledge to tell you something about each of them. Time, of course, will not permit this tonight and for the same reason those who have served in other capacities cannot be specifically mentioned. We have always been careful to select and fortunate to obtain men of character and standing as officers. I should, however, be remiss did I fail to speak of our Secretary Emeritus, Brother Otis Merriam, who for thirty-six years filled his office, never but once missing a single communication, regular or special. Today, as in former troublous times, our members may be found in the Armed Service of their country, offering their lives that its basic principles may endure.

Our relations with the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, with our parent Lodge and our Brethren generally have never failed to be harmonious and pleasant, and at the time of our great conflagration in 1908, generous offers of sympathy and help were made to us throughout the entire jurisdiction. With the outer world we have always had the most cordial intercourse.

The Church has ever shown a broad mind towards us. Distinguished clergymen have taken membership with us, invited us to their services, and in the Chaplain's seat have brought us their active help. We have had a creditable share in community life and have always taken as large a part in public occasions as the regulations of our Order would permit. Our members have times without number been honored by election to office in the Councils of the City and the State, and of the distinguished citizens who have filled the Chair of Chief Magistrate since our establishment, eight have come from our ranks. Our records show that we have been mindful of our duty when private loss and public calamity have come to our knowledge, and that in an effective but unobtrusive way we have been a helpful force in the life of our municipality.

In all these things we recognize ourselves as but a small part of a great Fraternity whose Lodges and whose members have everywhere made similar records for themselves. Such good things as have been vouchsafed to us to do have not been recorded on our books for our self-praise, nor are they mentioned here in any spirit other than that of gratitude that the opportunity to do them has been ours.

And now, Brethren, that this sketch may not tire your patience further, it must be brought to an end at once. Incomplete as it has been, there has perhaps been something to entertain and something worth our while to know. Its purpose has been to do honor to our founders; to set their portraits before us, not only for remembrance, but for example; to show us how fine is our heritage and let us judge how far we have maintained its spirit, and to inspire us to go onward with new courage and with the determination to keep our record pure as his whose honored name we bear.

Perhaps no better closing word can be found than that uttered at the banquet board on the evening of our constitution seventy-five years ago, and happily preserved in the record of the occasion, when this toast, the first of the night, was offered while the Brethren drank to it, standing and in silence: "To the sacred memory of Robert Lash. May the Lodge which is hereafter to bear his name never cease to illustrate his virtues" – with the determination to keep our record pure as his whose honored name we bear.

Perhaps no better closing word can be found than that uttered at the banquet board on the evening of our constitution seventy-five years ago, and happily preserved in the record of the occasion, when this toast, the first of the night, was offered while the Brethren drank to it, standing and in silence: "To the sacred memory of Robert Lash. May the Lodge which is hereafter to bear his name never cease to illustrate his virtues."

CENTENARY HISTORY, DECEMBER 1967

From Proceedings, Page 1967-572:

By R.W. Edward W. East

On the sixth day of December, in the year 1867, a group of Master Masons met in Fraternity Hall at the corner of Broadway and Everett Avenue in our city. They were Brothers John Edmunds, Josiah A. Osgood, James M. Greenwood, William Reed, George W. Churchill, Benjamin P. Shillaber, James S. Dillingham, James E. Barrell, Sumner Carruth, Hadley P. Burrill, Davis W. Bailey, Alexander Campbell, Alpheus J. Hillbourn, Samuel Batchelder, Thomas H. Carruth, Frederick Spoor, Samuel Orcutt, Rufus S. Owen, Slade Luther, Horace P. Eldridge, Joseph Brooks, Michael Watson and Joseph P. Flint. Also, these Worshipful Brethren, John Low, Eben W. Lothrop, John F. Fellows, Tracy P. Cheever, William A. Williams and Charles F. Haynes.

All these Brethren, 29 in number, were substantial and well-known citizens, and even at this date, their names are not without significance to the older residents of our city. Their memories should be especially cherished by Robert Lash Lodge because they were its founders and charter members. With the exception of two, they were all members of Star of Bethlehem Lodge and six of them were among its Past Masters.

Strange as it may seem, the scribe of this history is unable to discover a single lineal descendent of any one of them who holds membership with us today. When we look further into this aspect, we are reminded that Chelsea's population has changed in tone with each passing decade. The first meeting on December 6, 1867, two years after the Civil War, was conducted by Brother Eben W. Lathrop and Brother George W. Churchill who kept the record, happily preserved, and from which these facts were taken.

By previous arrangement, these brethren met and the chairman announced that the object of the meeting was "to deliberate on the condition of the order in this city and place and to consider its needs of another Lodge." It was agreed that a petition to the M.W. Grand Lodge asking for a dispensation authorizing them to meet as a regular Lodge to confer degrees should be prepared.

Wor. Bro. Lothrop, a six-term Past Master of Star of Bethlehem Lodge, was assigned the delicate task of obtaining the necessary consent from Star of Bethlehem Lodge. It was then voted to raise the funds necessary to obtain the dispensation by loan. "Where upon", says the Secretary, "Brothers Carruth and Lothrop at once offered to furnish the same." It was then voted that in no case was the membership to exceed 100 and the meeting adjourned after expressing "its determination to promote harmony and good-fellowship with all true Lodges and Masons throughout the jurisdiction and especially with the Parent Lodge from which it sprung, Star of Bethlehem." The last matter of consideration at this meeting was the very important one of selecting a name for the proposed new Lodge, whereupon Bro. Benjamin P. Shillaber suggested the name of the late Robert Lash.

The choice was wise and fully deserved by our Wor. Bro. Robert Lash, who was born in Boston on November 7, 1779, educated in its public schools and was among the first to receive the Franklin Medal for scholarship and distinction alike for the purity of his private life and the integrity of his business career. He was an official of the old Boston Bank in the North End for over 50 years. He lived here most of his life and commuted from Chelsea to Boston via the Winnisimmet Ferry for the outrageous amount of 2 cents per day. His Masonic record was a most notable one even by our present standards. Raised in Mount Lebanon Lodge in 1801 he twice served it as Master, once in 1812 and again in 1822.

For 15 years he held office in the Grand Chapter of Massachusetts, reaching the chair of District Dep. Grand High Priest. In 1824 he was elected Commander of Boston Commandery, Knights Templar, and in 1832 Grand Master of the Grand Encampment K. T. of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. In 1844 he was Senior Grand Warden of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts.

For the last 20 years of his life his home was at the corner of Chestnut and Fourth Streets in Chelsea where he died in October 1863 at the age of 83. An account of his funeral, too lengthy for our pages here, was in all Masonic publications then in circulation where it appears that the Grand Master officiated at his services. His home Lodge, Mount Lebanon, was in charge and under the escort of Boston Commandery and Palestine Commandery K.T. accompanied by the cortege to Woodlawn Cemetery, where the Chaplain of Mount Lebanon Lodge performed the burial service of the Order in a most impressive manner.

On January 21, 1867 the new Lodge met in Masonic Hall. The Grand Master's dispensation was read and the Lodge opened in due form. At this meeting, the daughters of Robert Lash presented to the new Lodge his Jewels and Insignia of office and a distinguished brother brought us the old trestle board which Brother Lash had used nearly 50 years before in Mount Lebanon Lodge. The first candidate for degrees was George Willcomb, who remained a prominent member until his death in 1912.

The fourth Wednesday of the month, our present meeting night, was chosen for Regular Communications and the Brethren adopted a By-Law whereby membership should be granted only by ballot after proposal, investigation and report and only at a Quarterly Communication. On December 13, 1867, at the Quarterly Meeting of the Grand Lodge, our Charter was granted and on December 23, 1867, Robert Lash Lodge was formally constituted by Most Worshipful Charles C. Dame, Grand Master, assisted by all of his officers in the presence of many distinguished guests, among whom were Past Grand Masters Winslow Lewis and William Parkman, and the two oldest members of Star of Bethlehem Lodge, Rev. Charles H. Leonard and Brother William S. Merriam. The ceremony of constitution being completed, the Most Worshipful Grand Master installed our first officers under the Charter.

For seven years we met in old Masonic Hall at the corner of Broadway and Everett Avenue, owned by our Wor. Bro. John Low. Our removal was to the new Masonic Hall in Campbells' Block at the corner of Broadway and Third Street, its dedication being probably the most elaborate Masonic event Chelsea ever saw. The Grand Master was present and officiated; a throng of distinguished visitors gathered to participate. Bro. Tracy P. Cheever prepared and delivered in his faultless manner a history of the five Masonic bodies of the city, which for many years was the last resort in the settlement of local discussions affecting the Fraternity.

Here was the Masonic birthplace of many of us because it was our abode until 1908, when the catastrophy called the "Great Chelsea Fire" left us homeless. Our East Boston brethren permitted us to use their Temple until 1910 when our present Temple was made ready for us. I very well remember, as a child of 13 years, of witnessing the dedication of this building we are now in, because it was an event of wide local civic importance, particularly where I watched Fred Faunce in his Templar uniform, and our local undertaker, accidently step into a trough of mortar half-way to his knees. Not so humorous, where his weight was over 250 pounds. I remember being awed by what seemed to be so many dignitaries present with their official collars on. Robert Lash Lodge has held in all 1004 Communications. The old By-Law limiting membership to 100 was repealed in 1890.

More than a thousand brethren have signed its membership roll; 338 of whom are still holding their membership.

Five of the six Worshipful Masters first named wore the Union Blue in the days of 1861. Twice have Past Masters been succeeded by their sons, and the Oriental Chair has also been occupied by the two brothers Rockwell. There have been in all 52 Worshipful Masters, of whom 19 are still living. Seven times we have been honored by the Grand Master in the appointment of District Deputies: Right Worshipful Brothers Means, Crandon, William H.L. Odell, Harrower, Craft, East, and Maddocks who has just finished his assignment. In 1943, as in former troublesome times, our members were found in the armed forces of our country.

Our relations with our Parent, the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge and our brethren, generally have never failed to be harrnonious and pleasant, and when at the time of our great conflagration in 1908, we really remember the generous offers of sympathy and help that were made to us throughout the Grand Jurisdiction. With the outer world, we have always had a most cordial intercourse.

The Church has ever shown a broad mind to us, distinguished clergymen have taken membership with us, invited us to their services and in the Chaplains' Chair have brought us their active help.

We have had a creditable share in community life and have always taken as large a part in public occasions as the regulations of our order would permit. Our members have times without number been honored by election to office in the Councils of the city and state and of the distinguished citizens who have filled the chair of chief magistrate since our establishment, eight have come from our ranks. Our records show that we have been mindful of our duty when private loss and public calamity have come to our attention, and that we have been effective, in an unobtrusive way, to be a helpful force in the life of our Chelsea Municipality.

Lack of space forbids mention of many items of interest, but in what is here set forth, there has perhaps been something to remember in our Masonic years in retrospection. The purpose has been to do honor to our founders, to set forth their portraits before us, not only for a remembrance but for example; to show us how fine is our heritage and let us judge how far we have maintained its spirit, and to inspire us to go forward with a courage of Masonry and with determination to keep our record pure as his, whose honored name we bear, Robert Lash.


OTHER

  • 1897 (Participation in Revere cornerstone laying, 1897-241)
  • 1898 (Participation in Chelsea corner stone laying, 1898-102)
  • 1909 (Participation in Chelsea corner stone laying, 1909-73)
  • 1912 (Participation in Chelsea Masonic Hall dedication, 1912-1)
  • 1940 (Reduction of fees authorized, 1940-196)

EVENTS

CONSTITUTION OF LODGE, DECEMBER 1867

Our Brethren at Chelsea had this new and promising Lodge duly constituted by the Grand Lodge, on Monday the 21st inst. The occasion was a most gratifying one, and was enjoyed by all present. The Lodge is composed of brethren who are zealous in the cause, and whose intelligence and characters are a sufficient guarantee that the reputation of the Lodge will be such as to reflect honor on the memory of the estimable brother whose name it has adopted.

At the conclusion of the ceremonies of installation, the company sat down to a bountiful and handsomely served banquet, at which speeches made by Brs. Cheever (who presided), Dame, G. M., Parkman, Lewis, Moore, Thompson, Sutton, Churchill, and others. A humorous poem, written for the occasion, was delivered by "Mrs. Partington," Br. Benj. P. Shillaber, which was well received by the company. The officers for the year, are as follows : —

  • James S. Dillingham, Jr., W. M.
  • John Edmunds, S.W.
  • Isaac Dillingham, J.W
  • George W. Churchill, Treasurer
  • S. S. Owen, Secretary
  • William Shillaber, S. D.
  • John H. Roberts, J. D.
  • John Low, S. S.
  • J. F. Fellows, J. S.
  • Sumner Carruth, Marshal
  • T. H. Carruth, Inside Sentinel
  • Amos Seavey, Tyler
  • Tracy P Cheever, Organist

QUARTERLY MEETING, FEBRUARY 1869

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. XXVIII, No. 6, April 1869, Page 187:

Robert Lash Lodge, of Chelsea, observes its Quarterly Meeting, by a social sit-down, pleasantly enjoying the hour, and illustrating, in a very agreeable manner, the most prominent principle of Masonry; for the promotion of sociality and brotherly unity underlies the charity that is a fruit of the kindness eliminated. One of these Quarterly Meetings, of a peculiarly interesting character, was held on the evening of February 24, at which were present a brilliant array of Masonic magnates, who are honorary members of this young Lodge. These consisted of W .P. G. Masters Winslow Lewis, [http://www.masonicgenealogy.com/MediaWiki/index.php?title=GMParkman Wm. Parkman, Wm. D. Coolidge, and C. C. Dame, W.G.M. Wm. Sewall Gardner, and William Sutton, C. W. Moore and R. L. Robbins, and Br. D. N. Chase.

W. Tracy P Cheever, D.D.G.M., presided, by invitation of W.M. Dillingham, and under his inspiration the moments passed very happily. A new feature, that heightened the interest of this occasion, was the introduction of a book of original songs, written expressly for this Lodge, appropriate to each degree and condition of those present, the singing of which, at intervals, by the Nightingale Club, gave a pleasing variety to the feast of reason that transpired.

The guests of the evening were welcomed in a neat speech and the "Honorary Members' Song," which embraced all the names of those present, and ambitiously went among the distinguished of the Fraternity for more; and W.G.M. Gardner was called up by the toast — The plant of Freemasonry, destined to grow and flourish under the culture of our accomplished Gardner.

The Grand Master responded in a speech tributary to the memory of Robert Lash, and complimented the Lodge upon the course it had adopted in illustrating the social — the family — relations of Freemasonry. This sociality was better exemplified in small Lodges, where all arc known to each other, and where comfort and companionship are better enjoyed.

W. P. G. M. Lewis was introduced as a lineal descendant of St. Luke the "beloved physician," who said, that while others present represented all degrees of Masonry, he had attained to the degree of old age, which he affirmed to be a very miserable degree. He gave a short but feeling address in praise of the virtues of Masonry so well shown in the life of the one whose honored name the Lodge bore. He alluded to the devotion of Robert Lash to the Institution, and also that of those so well qualified to appreciate its virtues, citing the case of one who, from age, was induced to ask his discharge, which was granted, but whose heart failed as soon as the door closed behind him, and he returned, begging to be reinstated, to die with his brethren. The remarks of this veteran were received with the deepest interest.

R.W. C. W. Moore, P.D.G.M., the early companion and friend of Robert Lash, who, with Dr. Lewis, were intimately associated with him, was introduced as the " Compendium of Masonry," and gave a review of the exemplary life of Robert Lash. In the dark hours of Masonry, when character was a matter of consequence, he. was above reproach, his integrity beyond doubt, and the most malignant of the revilers of the institution confessed his personal worth.

W. P.G.M. Coolidge made a pleasant speech, commending the social auspices of Masonry, and closing a brief tribute to Robert Lash with the toast: Memory of the Past — Hope of the Future.

W. P.G.M. Parkman was called to his feet as the "Admirable Crichton of Masonry", who praised the genial influence of Masonry, and pronounced it a great invention of King Solomon in conceiving an Institution in which men of all opinions can pull in a common harness. Robert Lash was a humble man, but his devotion to duty made him prominent.

R. W. P.G.M. Dame made a brief speech, commending the social characteristics of the Lodge, and trusted that the light it shed would stimulate the fraternity everywhere.

R.W. Wm. Sutton, in a few remarks, closed the speechmaking of the guests.

Speeches were then made by several members of the Lodge, and many good things were said and sung; Mrs. Partington being in her best humor, and Ike in his best voice. The old lady had been riding the velocipede, in which she found great difficulty, and experienced a new sensation, which she described in rhyme.

On the above occasion there were no liquors, and the enjoyment was of the most elevated character, needing no stimulus beyond the inspiration of the moment. No one ever looked on a happier scene. Another feature connected with these gatherings: we learn that the expense does not come out of the fund of the Lodge, but that each contributes his quota, if able; if not, some one else does it for him. Thus no burden comes upon the Institution — an example that also deserves being followed.

INSTALLATION, DECEMBER 1870

From Moore's Freemason's Monthly, Vol. XXX, No. 4, February 1871, Page 105:

Robert Lash Lodge, located at Chelsea, held its annual meeting on Wednesday, the 28th of December, when its officers were duly installed by the District Deputy Grand Master, R. W. Tracy P. Cheever; W. Bro. John Edmands is Master; Wm. Shillaber, Senior Warden; John H. Roberts, Junior Warden. We have not the names of the remaining officers. After the installation, a bountiful collation was provided in the Banquet Hall, where brief speeches were made by P. G. M. Dame, R. W. Wm. Sutton, R. W. Bro. Cheever, and Bros. B. P. Shillaber, who read a humorous poem, Wm. Parkman, Jr., and others. We understand that the occasion was a very pleasant one, though the evening out doors was far otherwise, and prevented the personal attendance of some of the more aged honorary members of the Lodge, who had contemplated being present.

INSTALLATION, NOVEMBER 1879

From Liberal Freemason, Vol. III, No. 9, December 1879, Page 280:

Robert Lash Lodge held its Annual Communication on the evening of November 26th. This Lodge has been celebrated since its organization, in 1867, for its eminently friendly and social qualities, and these features have characterized its gatherings. The Annual meetings have been well attended, it being a rule with the members to give the officers a hearty welcome to their respective stations, and encouragement to engage with zeal in the duties of the year.

At this meeting, Robert P. Means was elected W. M., John H. Cunningham, S. W., John Strahan, J. W., and Rufus S. Owen, was re-elected Secretary. The ceremonies of installation were performed by W. Bro. Charles M. Avery.

It has been customary to present the retiring Past Master with a Jewel, and this expense has been borne by contributions from the members. In consequence of the times, this has been delayed for four years, but has now been handsomely observed, as P. M. John H. Roberts, Franklin O. Barnes, and Benj. F. Dodge, who retired from office respectively, in 1875, '77, '79, were each presented with a Past Master's Jewel of gold, handsomely wrought and suitably inscribed. The presentation was made by Bro. A. B. Richardson, S. D., in a very neat and appropriate speech, and as might be expected, the responses were grateful and graceful. A season of social intercourse followed, and a collation was served, and the brethren separated well pleased with the occasion.

INSTALLATION, DECEMBER 1908

From New England Craftsman, Vol. IV, No. 4, January 1909, Page 142:

The officers of Robert Lash Lodge of Chelsea, Mass., were installed on Wednesday, December 23d in the presence of a large number of members of the Lodge and many distinguished guests. The installing officer was Right Worshipful William H. L. Odell, Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, and past master of Robert Lash lodge. The leading guest of the occasion was Most Worshipful Grand Master John Albert Blake; with him were William M. Belcher, Senior Grand Warden; Thomas W. Davis, Recording Grand Secretary; Everett C. Benton, past Deputy Grand Master; James Gould, Harry P. Ballard and Horace S. Bacon, District Deputy Grand Masters of the Third, Seventh and Eleventh Districts; Melvin M. Johnson, Grand Marshal; Rev. R. Perry Bush, Grand Chaplain; and Worshipful Brothers R. Walter Milliard, Charles T. C. Whitcomb, Nesbit G. Gleason, George H. Graves, E. Ernest Murray, Robert W. Oliver and Charles G. Bird.

The guests were cordially welcomed by Worshipful Master Walter S. Litchfield. He was especially complimentary to Rt. Wor. Brother Odell to whom he said it was a great pleasure to his lodge to know of the honors that had come to him and that his lodge associates wishing to show their regard for him in a more tangible way had procured a gold jewel emblematic of his present office which they desired him to wear as a symbol of their love and esteem. The speaker closed in these terms: "Robert Lash lodge wishes you the greatest joy and it knows that you abundantly merit this distinction."

"The unexpected has happened," said Deputy Odell. He hadn't anticipated any such offering, and it was highly prized because the sentiments accompanying the gift came, he knew, from the heart. He congratulated the master on the ability he displayed in his two years, and remarked that the gift was thrice welcome owing to his associations with the spokesman. "I am thankful if I have done anything to help the lodge," said the recipient of the jewel.

'I'he organization for the ensuing year is as follows: George A. Clotigh WM, Wilber A. Dykeman SW, James S. Harrower JW, Charles G. Robert (PM) T, Otis Merriam S, John M. Finck C, Edwin R. Hoag M, William B. Denison SD, Melvin M. Tukey JD, Fred S. Hutchins SS, Herbert P. Wells JS, Albert L. Worden IS, Martin D. Williams Organist, William H. Nudd Tyler.

SPECIAL COMMUNICATION, MARCH 1918

From New England Craftsman, Vol. XIII, No. 7, April 1918, Page 217:

A special communication of Robert Lash Lodge was held in Masonic Temple, Chelsea, Sunday, March 31st at 2 P. M.

Robert Lash Lodge with the other Masonic bodies of Chelsea accepted the invitation of their chaplain, Rev, Bro. John H. Quint, D.D., to attend divine worship at the First Congregational Church, Chelsea, on Easter Sunday.

At 2.15 the brethren assembled at Masonic Temple to witness the unfurling of the Masonic service flag to the tune of martial music by the Metropolitan City Band, after which they marched to the church under escort of Palestine Commandery, K. T.

Conveyances were provided for brothers who on account of age or infirmity would otherwise be unable to attend.

All Masons were cordially invited and ample accommodations were provided at the church for friends and relatives, ladies as well as gentlemen.


GRAND LODGE OFFICERS

OTHER BROTHERS


DISTRICTS

1867: District 2 (Charlestown)

1883: District 3 (East Boston)

1911: District 3 (East Boston)

1927: District 3 (Boston)


LINKS

Massachusetts Lodges